RN Professions

Ep. 4: Clinical Coordinator

December 21, 2019 Season 1 Episode 4
RN Professions
Ep. 4: Clinical Coordinator
Chapters
RN Professions
Ep. 4: Clinical Coordinator
Dec 21, 2019 Season 1 Episode 4
Alli Merrell, Leticia Davies

In today's episode we talk with Leticia Davies who was one of my preceptors when I became an MS Nurse Educator. Tish is a fantastic communicator and shares with us her unique role as a Clinical Coordinator within the pharmaceutical industry.

Show Notes Transcript

In today's episode we talk with Leticia Davies who was one of my preceptors when I became an MS Nurse Educator. Tish is a fantastic communicator and shares with us her unique role as a Clinical Coordinator within the pharmaceutical industry.

Alli:
00:00
In today's episode, we talk with Letitia Davies, who was one of my preceptor's when I became an MS nurse educator. Tish is a fantastic communicator and shares with us her unique role as a clinical coordinator within the pharmaceutical industry.
Alli:
00:57
How long have you been a nurse?
Tish Davies:
00:58
I have been in her since 2009. It's when I graduated nursing school. So coming up on, you know, 10 years?
Alli:
01:05
That was exactly the same as me to 2009. Yeah. Yeah. So what is your current RN profession?
Tish Davies:
01:12
Um, currently I am a Nurse Educator or they call it a clinical coordinator for a company called BioMarin.  And they specialized in rare disease. 
Alli:
01:23
Okay, so I know that this wasn't your first nursing job. So what was her very first nursing job?
Tish Davies:
01:29
My very first nursing job. I was a nurse in the emergency room at a trauma center in Salem, Oregon.
Alli:
01:36
So did you have any other jobs leading up to this current role? What did that look like for you?
Tish Davies:
01:41
Yeah, so I started out in the ER And Salem is a bit of a drive for me, but, um, in 2009 there was the economic collapse, and so finding ah, nursing job was super hard. So I did have to go quite a ways from home to find a job. So once I got several years of specialized training under my belt in the ER, I was able to get a job in my local town, Portland, and I worked actually in several different emergency rooms. Finding ah, work family that feels good is super important to me. And so I finally landed at a small community hospital in my town, Um, in the emergency room. And it was some of the best time I've ever had. Working with some amazing nurses who helped me grow, uh, you know, personally. And also in my nursing skills and in my career. So it was It was a neat experience.
Alli:
02:36
So then you did mostly emergency room nursing up until you became a nurse. Educator?
Tish Davies:
02:41
Yes, Emergency room. It's what I have wanted to do since I really knew what being a nurse was. I had a background in EMS/ It was an administrative assistant for a big ambulance company here in Portland. And so, um, I just I always enjoyed that kind of, you know, fun and stress and excitement. And so emergency is always where I wanted to land. That was like, my ultimate goal was to be an emergency room nurse. So
Alli:
03:11
So what in the world happened where you just from? Because I know as a nurse educator, it is such a different speed. So connect those dots for me. How did you find out about the educator position and kind of what led you into being more interested in that type of career?
Tish Davies:
03:26
Yeah. So, um, when you really think about something for years and you want. That's what you want to do in your heart. You know you can kind of glorify. You don't know necessarily all the nitty gritty details of what's in that job. And so for me, that was the case. I loved it. I don't regret my decision, but I think day in and day out. It's a very traumatic job, not just for the patients that are going through their traumas but as a caregiver. As a nurse, you know, you are by these people sides on the worst day of their life. Um, and family members, you see a lot of a lot of death and Thio, you know, young, old, you know, it doesn't matter. And so that that could be really, um, you know, taxing emotionally. And then also, there was, um, a lot of abuse going on to health care professionals, so patients will come in and be abusive towards the staff. You know, nurses, doctors. Nobody was excluded from that, especially in the emergency room. Again, we're talking about people that are either experiencing a trauma or are having a perceived trauma. And so, um, they're obviously not their best Selves, and sometimes that gets taken out on the emergency room staff. And so, um, you know, dealing with that. And then I think, you know, seeing the abuse of the health care system in the emergency room. And I'm just how people misuse it and everything. I just I got this point in my heart where I was really, you know, jaded. And I think just needed a break. But I wasn't aware of this. So that was one part of my decision or one part of what kind of lead up to my change. The other part was, I have two little girls and my oldest was getting ready to start kindergarten, which is a new organ. Full day of school. Monday through Friday, you know, 8 a.m. tow 3 p.m. And for me, working the shift I was working. I was working at 10 a.m. To 10 p.m. Shift. I don't on me. I am not going to see my child. I work every other weekend and then, you know, three days a week, which isn't a lot of days a week. But again, it's enough when you're only saying your child in the afternoon and evening. I was at work one day in the e. R. And I had a friend who was talking about this nurse, educator wool, and I just heard her talking about it. And I'm like, Gosh, that sounds amazing. I It's not anything I would have ever thought of doing or would have ever. You know, it's nothing I dreamed of doing growing up. But just hearing her describe this I'm like, Wow, that sounds like an amazing opportunity. So when that was done eavesdropping, I walked over and I was like, Hey, I heard you talking about this, you know, amazing sounding job. If you pass it up, let me know. I would love to apply for it. And just like, Oh, you know, in my life right now is not a good time for me to be changing careers. So here's the contact info for the person to talk to you about it. Give him a call, see if you're interested in good luck. I was like, All right, good. So it kind of started right there just for you? Very very. Yeah, Yeah. I always say it was like it was the change I didn't know I needed because until I stepped away from bedside, I didn't realize how how much everything was affecting me, you know, because I think especially in E m s when you're in it day to day you you're just you're just getting through you, you go to work. I loved my co workers. My team. That's really what made it bearable was the people that I worked with. But, um, you know, you go in there, you do your job, you come home, you're exhausted. You know, you've given it 150% you know, and then you go back in the next day and do it all again. And so your days offered, You really were just recovering from your north 3 12 hour crazy shifts where you, you know, just been sucked dry. So it was the change. I didn't know I needed so pressure.
Alli:
07:20
So emergency room. That's like having history, their experience and their kind of I mean, I know that opens doors into almost any field that you want to go into. But what would you say specifically? But if someone is wanting to maybe switch into an educator type rule. What did the interview process look like for you? What? What types of things did you need to highlight about your experiences? To make sure that you know the cross over into the educator role would be to show that that would be a good fit for you.
Tish Davies:
07:48
Yeah, the the biggest thing that I hit on because I knew my experience was very, um, specialized was the fact that I am educating patients day in and day out. Like from the moment I get to work to the moment I leaves, I am doing continuous education jump for these patients a lot of times where their primary care, um, plans on making sure these patients are educated about their disease. State know their next steps, you know, can advocate for themselves at their next doctor's appointments. That kind of thing. I really highlighted how we do that. And then they also wanted me to touch on, you know, some points in my career that were maybe, like, difficulty or defeating those kind of things. And so I was really able to utilize a lot of my E r experiences, you know, on the fact that you know, sometimes you give it 150% you know, with that code or with that, and you still the patient's still dies or you know, you it's not the outcome. You what you tried so hard for and so experiencing failure in that way. And also, um, you know, experiencing failure on, like, a lesser level. Maybe there's that, like, chronic alcoholic who keeps coming into the E r, you know, just passed out drunk, covered in his own filth. And you try and do education with the patient every time you get him sobered up, cleaned up, back out the door, doing that education with, um on, you know where help is, You know, howto howto seek the help that so just really highlighting how I worked with these patients to provide, you know, education. And then also the fact that, you know, we we, um top patients had to do their own in this instance. Subcutaneous injections. Um, we do that in the e r. You know, blood thinning medicine that people get discharged home with. So we do a little bit of teaching on that. So I was familiar with howto go through a step by step process on patients on howto care for themselves. I think that highlighting that portion because it was having to do a lot with the job, it was really important. Another piece that really helped me prepare for it was the phone number that my coworker gave me was actually a phone number to a nurse who was doing the job Currently. Um, and so any time you're looking for this kind of position, I think talking to somebody who is currently in the role may be the one that I spoke with. Her name is Brandy, and she was in Utah and she was able to really give me a breakdown of the job, what the job looked like. And then she also was an amazing resource and that she told me what they were looking for. She let me know what method they used for interviewing. It's called the Star Method. And ah, lot of the pharmaceutical companies used that method. So, you know, preparing for the storm that of interviewing is was a big step for me to just know that ahead of time. Uh, I'm sure let me know what they were looking for in candidates. so again, talking to somebody in that field really helped me prepare myself for what the interview process was like, what to expect as far as questions and then kind of the management personality style. So who my manager was and what her personality waas You know who the director? Because these are the people that were interviewing me, who the director was her personality cells and knowing the things that had a time allowed me to, um I'm not making anything up per se, but just be able to kind of make my response is using my experiences and what I had been through to make it fit what they were looking for so that I could demonstrate how I would be a good fit for the team. So
Alli:
11:24
that's such a good point. Actually, I had cold. Excuse me. When I started looking into this position, I talked with Brandy and it was just having that person that, um, you see a role, you see a position written out on paper like Oh, that sounds wonderful. But talking to the person you like, So what is this like like, what is it like every day? Like, what are you, you know, Tell me what your day looks like having that, um, you're so right. Having that person kind of give you an inside insider's view to what it actually is. Um, it's really right, because you can you can see your future there, but you can also have the proper conversations leading up to it. So in the interview, you know, you can really refine what you're saying. So that's such a good point. And I feel like now, with lengthen like we really don't have any excuse to not reach out to anybody if we're looking into a new position because there's so many right reach out to Yes. So your role, eh? So you're a nurse educator. But you said, Is it clinical coordinator? Is that your title?
Tish Davies:
12:20
Yeah. So in my current role, yeah, I'm a what they call a clinical coordinator, and it's this company chose that versus a nurse educator because there are registered dietitians also doing the same job I'm doing. And so they didn't want to, like pigeon Hole, that type of person that could do this job. And that is solely based. Yeah, and it's solely based on the fact that, um, be specific patient population that I'm serving its peak a u patients. Patients with fennel key, Tony area. They, um, in the past have on Lee been managed by registered dietitians and physicians up until recently, where they now have actual medication that they can take for their disease process. And so it was an appropriate time to have a registered dietitians on the team as well as nurses. So
Alli:
13:14
So can you tell me, like, what? Your day to day? Maybe a day in the life. What does that look like for you?
Tish Davies:
13:20
Yeah, definitely. And every day is different, so I kind of get my fix. Kind of like I did in the emergency room. I hate monotony. I hate every day being the same. It's it's very boring. It doesn't fill my, you know, happiness cup. You know, I need I need, um, variation and change in my life to feel happy. So thankfully, this job have it. So, um, a lot of times when I'm getting started for a day or even a week, I would, you know, on a Monday, sit down and kind of plan my week, um, reach out to patients the other phone to set up appointments to get together. See what patients will be starting on the new therapy. What patients will be need just checking in on to see how they're doing those kind of things cause I manage patients from the time they they start on therapy to the time they go off there be and everything in between. So it's my responsibility to be checking in with them. So it kind of set aside Monday's Thio. Just get myself on track, get back together, get in touch with patients I hadn't, you know, chatted with for a while. Um, and then Tuesdays. Oh, tend to be my out in about days And those are gonna be days where you know, I take the kids to school and then head out for the day. And this could be seeing anywhere from one patient to maybe two or three patients, depending on, um, what I have going on. And so my territory is quite large because it's a rare disease. There aren't a lot of patients in one geographical area with it. So I see patients in Portland, actually, all of Oregon from, you know, holy down as far south as Medford, um, all the way up to Washington. And then my territory also includes Idaho. So I've covered those three states. So sometimes that could mean, uh, late. Sometimes that can mean just driving for several hours. It all depends on the patient that I'm seeing and where their act so. But on a typical day, I'd be driving to go see a patient, and this would be to get them either started on therapy or a check in visit. Um, and or if they're thinking of switching therapies, um, from one product that my company's, you know supports to a different product that my company supports. So just helping them out through their journey because it's, um, with a lot of disease. Process is not a destination. It's it's a journey. It's your life, You know? We're just going through this. I'm day by day. So and then typically, at the end of the week, I end up back in my office, tying up loose ends, responding to emails and just making sure that I haven't missed anything. Um, throughout the week. That's important
Alli:
16:02
is such a different piece of your role coming from emergency into this thing where you've got to check your email every day and yeah, totally a different thing. Thio have to prioritize. But can you tell me the difference between a home health nurse and what you do?
Tish Davies:
16:17
So I have not personally done any home health, so I but I can speak to you. Know what? I've had coworkers tell me as well as we did. Ah, round of home health and nursing school. So home health is, you know, in the morning you wake up, you know, you goto work, you get your patient assignments. Or maybe you got them the day before. Um, and then you you go out, you visit your patients and you can see a lot of patients in a day. You know, depending on, um, you know the length of your scheduled visit with those patients, So you could see, you know, eight patients plus a day. Um and and then that doesn't include your charting time. And so ah, lot of home health nurses would go out, get done what they need to get done as faras visiting the patient's doing, You know, the care plans, all that and then they have to come home and still do their charting. Um, I have a lot of patients. There are a lot of co workers that have done that in the past, and it was just what they needed to do to be ableto work around, you know, another person's schedule, that kind of thing. But it did take a lot of, like, evening time to do the work and keep on top of everything. Um, and the difference, I think in this role is the fact that my workload is this heavy or light as I want to make it. I dictate what patients I see on what days. And so you know, if and also I can spend an unlimited amount of time with my patients. So if I've got a patient and I just know by talking with them on the phone or texting them back and forth that they're just gonna need time and and you know, just not to be rushed, and we're gonna have a lot to go over Aiken Aiken, spend two hours with them, or more again, depending what they need. But I think two hours is about your you're Max to get things done and So I have that freedom to say, Yeah, this patient needs some time. I'm gonna spend that time with them. And if I only see one or two patients in a day, then I see one or two patients in the day like it's not, Um, nobody is dictating my schedule. That's that's something that I get to choose and I get to do myself, which I think is one of the best aspects of this job.
Alli:
18:28
I totally agree with you. So if you don't have anyone watching over your daily activities like your metrics for the day, I'm sure you have, like, monthly metrics where you know there's at least a certain specific goal they want you to reach or a certain number of patient touchpoints tohave. So I mean, am I right in your role? Do they have not for you. We, too, have
Tish Davies:
18:50
metrics on, and they're very different from the metrics at my previous job. So my previous job, when I was a nurse educator, they had daily touch point metric, so I had to have, um, a minimum of two patient visits a day, and that was an average. So there was some days where I didn't have any peace patient visits I would make. I would have to make it upto average out to be too patient visits a day on. And then also I would have to have so many health care provider interactions also in a day and again as kind of an average over, You know, the course of 1/4 in this position. They are not men, assuring how many times you see a patient, it's completely different with this position that I'm in. They measure adherence. So the medication that is taken orally that I support the measure, um, you know the time from getting the patient started as a metric, so getting once they're identified as a patient that could benefit from this medication by the doctor to getting him started as a metric and then another meth trick is once they started, their be keeping them on their B, and I get credit keeping them on their be up to 190 days. Once they reach 190 days, they switch over to another clinical coordinator who was a telephonic clinical coordinator, and then that telephonic clinical coordinator is gets credit for keeping them on 190 days plus, so that's kind of unique. And then there's an injectable medication that my company came out with, um, that I d trading on. And so again, it's not. It's getting them started on the therapy I get credit for, but then also keeping them on therapy. And, um, they do different measurements. So it's keeping him on 30 days, 60 days, 90 days, and then because this medication is fairly new, they don't have, um, you know much beyond that. But again, keeping these patients on therapy is my a metric that they're measuring me by then. So the number of times I see a patient or how many patients I see in a week is not a measurement. Nor is the amount of physician office interactions that I have in this position. They allow us to kind of decide what's an appropriate time to see a physician. And also, um, it's more of our, uh, the sales person's role to be in there and making that relationship in contact. Not so much the nurse educators role, which is really, really awesome. So
Alli:
21:29
that sounds really interesting. So they're really giving you the ability to kind of prioritize which patients need you and for how long, instead of how many doors you knock on and how many you know, office staff you're seeing. That's really cool, cause it feels like it's maybe a little bit of a deeper relationship with those patients while they're in that 1st 190 days. So yes, as you're educating them. I mean, I'm sure you have your product inserts and all those you know specifics that you're talking with, Um, you know, to your patients about. But what other kinds of tools and service is Are you using when you're in their homes or I'm assuming you're meeting them in home? Um, but what kind of conversations are you having? And how are you? You know what? What is your time with the patient? Actually look like
Tish Davies:
22:12
my conversation and education with parents and caregivers is gonna be a lot different than my education with adolescents. And even older. It'll put a meeting with the family. It's just ensuring the understand what the disease process is, how how it's so important for them to be managing it and keeping, you know, keeping their child's, um levels, you know, in check to help with their brain development. It's really the big thing. Is helping the family understand why it's important for this patient to start on their P and Y? It's important for them to stay on therapy. Um, and then the parents can identify goals for their child's a CE faras cognitive development. Or, you know, just being ableto it is more supporting that family versus the patient individually. And then once the patient hits adolescence, it's doing a lot of education on being their own advocates and being able to be responsible for their own management. And so it's teaching them how to advocate for themselves, teaching them what good looks like. Um, and and again, I use tools that my company provides because I can only speak thio what they have approved. But we get we get a fair amount of freedom and that, um, they provide us a lot of really amazing material. Um, and then with my adult patients, it's really identifying their goals. Adults and kids. You really have to get there by it. And they have to be. They have to be willing thio, you know, take the medication. They need to know why they're taking it in the benefits, See the benefit. Feel the benefit. Um, and sometimes with chronic disease, it's hard to see or feel a benefit when it's your everyday life. Um, and so, you know, helping them sit down, identify You know what? What they want for themselves is kind of one of those number one number one thing so that they can start moving towards those goals. So
Alli:
24:07
so what type of training or specific certifications Did you have to have to do this to do what you're doing?
Tish Davies:
24:13
Um, I don't need any specific certification. In my previous job, they wanted us to be, um, certified in the disease process that we were supporting, which was multiple sclerosis. So I was a multiple sclerosis certified nurse, which required examination to get that specialty certification. In this position, there is not a specialty certification. I'm just holding a nursing license and again preferred bachelor's degree squads the only requirement.
Alli:
24:43
So then, in addition to like the actual patient care, is there anything on the on the business side of things where you are in charge of either mentoring your leadership or or some sort of, you know, the corporate side of things. Do you Are you Are you Are you responsible for anything in that area for your job?
Tish Davies:
25:02
Oh, definitely. So especially this company that I work for, since it's a rare disease company and they're actually really small company located down in California. Sandra Fell area. They are really big about promoting from within and and being leading by example that kind of thing. So there are so many opportunities that they encourage us to partaken to be elite, better to be a mentor. So they have different meetings throughout the year where all the national clinical coordinators come together and we do different educations and trainings and so people can volunteer to help out with those into different aspects of the training and also management. My manager is very encouraging of us to participate in national, um, events. Ah, they do a lot of education on Facebook or making YouTube videos those kind of things. And so they encourage us to participate in those on dhe, then also mentoring one another. So during my on boarding, I meant toward with two different clinical coordinators, which was amazing because I got two different points of view on the same job and those two different points of view were so different. And so it really allowed me Thio get a good understanding of this job in my role. And you know how to do this job to be ableto see it from two vantage points. But, um and that's something that, um, the girls that were training me had been, you know, on for anywhere from about 2 to 4 years. And so they really encourage people to, you know, pretty early on start getting involved in different things. So, um, just different opportunities. Thio, you know, lead or educate, even as in your person, in my role, I'm being encouraged to share until lead, which is for me, really. I feel, you know, like a valued member of the team, even though I'm newer. So
Alli:
27:11
yeah, and that's so true because you coming from a place where, you know, hospital institution, there's there's so many people to talk to, you work with, learned from, so it kind of seems like at first this clinical coordinator position, you know, you're on your own, seeing your own patients making your own schedule. It almost sounds a little isolating, but But what you just said makes it sound like you've got this huge team behind you encouraging you spurring you on to, um, for that, your professional portfolio and kind of it sounds like you've got a good team that equips you for for more than just your daily tasks. It sounds like you guys work well together. Yeah,
Tish Davies:
27:44
and like Like you said, it could be hard. It could be a can. At times, I feel very isolated, and so you have to be aware of your feelings on that. So I'm a pretty social person. I loved a chat, and so I am. I've got, like, a few people that I consider, you know, like my mentors, who I try and talk Thio, You know, maybe once a week or so just to feel connected. So just being able to connect with them and see how things were going and just chat about different experiences that you're having in your different rules, that kind of thing, it really helps keep you from feeling isolated. Um, but then again, I think a lot of it, um, the ownership is on yourself. you know, And for me, that's an area where I struggle with two. Is that reaching out? I love talking with people, but I am horrible at initiating a conversation. And so, you know, if I'm feeling lonely, the only person to blame is myself, because I need to make some phone calls and reach out. And so, um, in my current position, my manager loves to know that we're asking questions and that we're reaching out for her. That's that's a really key sign. And that's one of the things that, um, my mentor noted that my manager really appreciated about me as I was. I was asking questions. I didn't mind reaching out. Thio, you know, my mentor or any of my teammates to ask, You know, I would call them silly questions, but I know that no question is a silly question. So I just asked away I assumed nothing, cause, you know, I think that's another big thing in this job. If if you're vulnerable and you ask those questions and and even, you know, it's like, yes, I don't know it all, and I'm never gonna claim to know it all, So I'm gonna ask all the questions that I think that that's a relief valued thing that a lot of managers and even co workers love. Because who doesn't love being a subject matter? Experts like when somebody comes to me and ask me a question that tells me that they think that I am knowledgeable, that I'm a subject matter expert and it's very flattering and also that so they're getting her question answered. And I also feel good because now I've, like, know that somebody considers me to be knowledgeable. And then I also got to help someone. I got to help a coworker. So it's like one of those win win situations. I love that about my development and team and everything.
Alli:
30:11
Yeah, and that's such an interesting perspective because it actually translates really beautifully into what you're actually doing for your patient. So you're you know you're equipping them. You're you're encouraging them to ask you questions to help them in their therapy and in there, you know, with their disease process. So in turn, it's kind of like you've gotta do the same for your you know, your own life. So, Tish, how does the compensation for your role compared to other nursing jobs. Or maybe I think people would probably most often consider like a nursing job in the hospital as kind of the standard salary. So how does your compensation compared to that?
Tish Davies:
30:46
A SZ faras Oregon goes, Um, the compensation for, uh hospital work in Oregon is pretty fair. So it's a It's a livable wage, I would guess to meet. It's about 90,000 year for an average, maybe a couple of your experience nurse. So then moving from that to industry Um, for me, it was a lateral financial move because the company that I work full is not a pharmaceutical company. Initially, it was like a a company that, um, hires nurses and then, um, contracts with pharmaceutical companies. So I was like a coming like a staff agency type thing. But you know, that kind of thing. So, um, so my compensation again was pretty much like straight across the board. I was making exactly what I was making, but my benefit was I had a very flexible work schedule, could make my own hours. I could be home when I wanted. I just lent to a lot more flexibility and lifestyle you know things. So I was just again that change that they needed toe, you know, help my help myself. Hell, from the years of working in the emergency room and then the other, And so that so when I went from that job to my current role, I'm going from a contract agency pharmaceutical role to working before the pharmaceutical company. The pay rate increased substantially. And so I think who you work for is kind of important. A CE faras pay goes. I think that working for a contract company is an amazing way to get your foot into working for a pharmaceutical company. Because pharma is a really small world, you know, it's, um just one of those were knowing someone or being in the industry helps you continue you to move up in the industry. And so, as an outsider to the industry, um, working in the emergency room, you know, I think having that agency middle step really helped me to become more marketable because now I have Well, I didn't work for a pharmaceutical company. I had experience working with a pharmaceutical company and knowing how that runs because it's a whole nother you know it's a whole nother way of thinking than in the hospital. So in the hospital we goto work thio, help our patients were not necessarily financially committed or back onto the hospital. You know, one of the hospitals and the writer and the green that year doesn't matter one bit. We are there for the patients and the care for them. And so moving into, um, these last couple of rules I've had where you know, either indirectly or directly work for pharmaceutical, we actually care how our business does. So while in here for the patients and supporting the patients, I also need my business to do well. Otherwise I don't you know I don't do well, or maybe they won't be able to fund my job. And so it's kind of one of those where I'm 100% for the patients. But then I actually also care about the organization because I want the organization to do well because not only are they doing good things for their patients, that they're hoping they're also keeping me employed. So now I'm now I'm doubly invested in in the the company's well being, so it's just a different wayto toe look at things, but yeah, compensation wise, working direct for pharmaceutical company definitely gets you a substantially higher pay rate than working as a bedside nurse for sure. Thank you
Alli:
34:25
for clearing. Trying to Because going from your contract to work for a pharmaceutical directly into pharmaceutical Just the difference between what those two actually are. I'm glad you pointed that out. That's a good point. So last question. Tish, if there was something you could tell the nursing student version of yourself, what would it be?
Tish Davies:
34:45
Mmm. I would tell myself, Thio, dedicate yourself 100% where you're at. I can't say I would do anything differently knowing what I know now, But I think you know, I would just continue to encourage myself to, you know, give it, give it your all, Because no matter where you go in your career, they're gonna want to know that you are a dedicated employee who gives 110% who is, you know, focused on what's important to them, which is, you know, patients and business. So, you know, if you're doing it for anything other than you know, fulfilling yourself, it's gonna be really hard to come to work every day and give it 100 and 10%. So make sure you're doing what you love. I think that that's a big difference. I'm doing what you love versus doing what you're doing to pay the bills. And I think when you confined enjoyment and satisfaction in your career, it really flows over to the rest of your life. So, you know, being able to even just the nurse was a dream come true for me. That's something I always wanted to do since childhood, and so that was very fulfilling. But then when I got to that point where it was like OK, I'm like getting burned out things air it's not that, you know, it's not that rose colored vision that I had and so but pouring yourself in even when it gets hard, I think really has benefited me and allowed me to be the best version of myself that I could be. And I think that when people see that they recognize like you're not just doing something to pay the bills, it's like you find joy in it and you find the film in it that s o
Alli:
36:27
Yeah, and your patients get so much out of that too, because they know that you're really there for them. And you're not just clocking in to check out, you know? So thank you so much to share coming on. And I'm telling us all about your very unique role and bets. I'm so glad that you found a job that you love and that you are so good at.
Tish Davies:
36:43
Yeah. So thank thank you. Thanks for having me. It's a pleasure. 
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