RN Professions

Ep. 2: RN, MSN, CEO

December 18, 2019 Season 1 Episode 2
RN Professions
Ep. 2: RN, MSN, CEO
Chapters
RN Professions
Ep. 2: RN, MSN, CEO
Dec 18, 2019 Season 1 Episode 2
Alli Merrell, Damion Jenkins

Damion Keith Jenkins is a Masters Prepared Registered Nurse, NCLEX Prep Expert, Nurse Content Writer, Educational Consultant and he has a real passion for nursing education! He specializes in providing individualized NCLEX Prep tutoring services for new graduate nurses - especially those who have experienced unsuccessful attempts. 

Damion's mission is to increase the number of nurses entering into the profession by helping them to develop strategies for success!

Show Notes Transcript

Damion Keith Jenkins is a Masters Prepared Registered Nurse, NCLEX Prep Expert, Nurse Content Writer, Educational Consultant and he has a real passion for nursing education! He specializes in providing individualized NCLEX Prep tutoring services for new graduate nurses - especially those who have experienced unsuccessful attempts. 

Damion's mission is to increase the number of nurses entering into the profession by helping them to develop strategies for success!

Alli:
00:00
you are listening to the RN Professions podcast episode number two. In today's episode, I talk with Damian Jenkins, who is a master's prepared registered nurse and CLECs prep expert, nurse content writer, educational consultant, and has a really passion for nursing education. Damien is the CEO of the Nurse Beak LLC, a nursing education and consulting company, and Block. He specializes in providing individualized in CLECs prep tutoring service is for new graduate nurses, especially those who have experienced unsuccessful attempts. Damien's mission is to increase the number of nurses entering into the profession by helping them develop strategies for success. Nurses seriously have the best job. Hi, I'm Allie. Join me each week is I interview nurses across the country to discuss their current nursing roles and responsibilities, schedules, salaries and so much more. Whether you're a nursing student fearing that dreaded in CLECs and established nurse looking for a change of scenery, or are simply curious about the wonderful world of registered nursing, this podcast is for you. Hello, Damien.
Damion Jenkins:
01:11
Hi, Alison. How are you?
Alli:
01:12
Good. How are you?
Damion Jenkins:
01:13
I'm doing well. Thank you.
Alli:
01:15
Good. I'm so excited to talk to you. I feel kind of like We've been friends for a while. I mean, we've had conversations in a Jiff, so I feel like we're old friends by now. Yeah. So, David and I know you because I kind of stock you online and I love are all of the articles that you've been posting and I think the time since we got connected. Until now, when we're actually physically talking, not in person, but as in person is that gets these days. I've really been enjoying your articles and everything that you're posting on. Instagram and Lincoln have been super fun for me. So anyone that's listening, that might not be a nursing student that, you know, maybe not not be thinking. This is for them. I feel like what you provide your super relevant for all nurses. So I just wanted to say that first of
Damion Jenkins:
01:55
all, thank you so much.
Alli:
01:57
Yeah. So? So, Damian, how long have you been a nurse?
Damion Jenkins:
02:00
So I've been a nurse going on 10 years. I graduated. And, um, spring of 2010.
Alli:
02:07
Okay. Can you just kind of give us a little overview of where you started in your nurse? First nursing job, and then where you've ended up.
Damion Jenkins:
02:16
Sure. So I started straight out of school in a sub acute rehab in a long term care setting. Ah, lot of my classmates were kind of, you know, really paining for these specialty jobs, like pediatrics and O. R and E. R. And things like that. But I'm a second career nurse, and at the time that I chose to go into nursing was when we were in our economic recession and so just kind of understanding coming from the food and House hospitality industry that financially, it wouldn't be advisable for me to wait 36 months, even 12 months toe land, that ideal job straight out of a nursing school. I took the first thing that I was offered, and so that was some acute rehab. And although Subba Curie have is one of probably one of the most challenging areas to kind of jump straight into as a new grad nurse, it teaches you so much. And so I feel like I really learned how to hit the floor running, um, and just got the whole kind of spectra from of nursing. From the socio economic standpoint to the outpatient follow up to Thea appointments and insurance and all of those things that you don't typically get into an acute care setting as a nurse. So that's why I started. I did that for a year and 1/2 before I decided that I needed to go back and get some acute care experience because, uh, six months out of nursing school, I decided that I wanted to go back and get my master's degree in nursing education because I saw such a need for really good nursing education. And I was inspired by many of my professors as well, um, to just kind of pass the torch and contribute. And, you know, I've already always really liked helping out sharing the knowledge that I know. So while I was in school, I became, you know, acute care. Did progressive care stepped down? Um, I see you. Oncology, med surge orthopedics, cardiac, cardiac, cath recovery, open heart. So a bunch of avenues in, um, thehe que care setting. And then, you know, we all face that dilemma. Sometimes where when you're going back to school, your facility might have a little bit of difficulty accommodating that schedule that you need to do your practicum and things like that. And so to just make it easier for everyone. I stopped working for the hospital directly and became an agency nurse, and that opened up a lot of opportunities for me as well. So I got Thio kind of take contracts all over the country, got my license in New York and Florida and Washington State in California. So I did contracts. And then I also did some local agency while I finish my master's program. And I finished that in 2014 and I've been a nurse educator, working both for college and doing agency nursing for like, the last seven years.
Alli:
05:24
Can you tell me what that actually is like? What is agency nursing?
Damion Jenkins:
05:27
Yeah, sure. So agency nursing is when you don't actually work for a specific healthcare institution. What you do is you negotiate and work with the hiring agency that is looking to fill the staffing need for our healthcare institution. And so when there's staffing, shortage, or maybe they're doing some turnover, or maybe they just had a lot of promotion. Things happen within, and maybe some of the nurses air leaving the bedside and are going more into administrative roles. The hospitals, even long term care facilities, need to fill those spots where the nurses would be at the bedside taking care of the patients. And so, as an agency nurse, you can, uh, be very selective in what part of the country you want to work in, Um, what season you wanna work in you can work for, You know, eight weeks, six weeks, 13 weeks. Um, basically, you're almost like an unofficial consultant because it's not purely based off of your, um, custom made contracts and things of that nature. It is all governed under another organization, which is the agency, But you can have you. Do you have some kind of negotiating power you can pick and choose when you want to take contracts? How long you want to stay in a contract? You can even choose to terminate contracts if it's not working out for you. But obviously, with any good business relationship or partnership terminated contract early, you know there could be negative consequences such as, you know, maybe not return to that facility, your things of that nature. So I learned a great deal about business kind of doing that straight um, into the agency, nursing just kind of learning about the contracts and learning about the negotiations and learning about how business is handled from this one agency Thio an institution and the exchange of cash flow and all of these different things. So it was very interesting to me, and I really enjoy doing it.
Alli:
07:30
Yeah, that's so cool. So you're kind of like an independent contractor. But you have. I mean, is that right Or do you have, like, like, tell me about, like, how you are insured like that comes through the agency? Or do you have to look for that yourself?
Damion Jenkins:
07:42
Yeah. So the interesting thing is, not every state or not every practitioner you know has to have, like, a liability insurance or even health insurance. Now, some facilities say okay In order for you to work here, we want you to be medically and ensure that way You're not a liability on our part. You know, making sure that you're having your regular checkups, your annual vaccines, all the good stuff, right? Make sure you're healthy, individual, and if you do get hurt that you have the coverage necessary and you don't become a liability of the institution. Same thing with like, um, you know, liability insurance for you, no malpractice or things of that nature. But what it is is these agencies kind of have package deals where if you wanted to be covered by them, they could offer that to you. I found that it was more expensive for my benefit to be insured through the agency, then maybe getting my own private plan. So I never opted in for the insurance that was provided through the agencies. But all of them provided is written in law that they have to offer it. Even if you're working a per diem status, they still have to offer you insurance because they have more than enough employees. And I'm throwing up quotations here. Um, so you know, there's always that kind of they have to meet the requirements, so they do offer it. You can be insured as an agency nurse.
Alli:
09:06
So how did you How did you find out about this job? Because it's super interesting. Like, did you just Google? Did you have a friend who was in in an agency and like, how did you find out about the different agencies
Damion Jenkins:
09:19
The need for nursing staff is just so high that there's seems to always be someone working next to me who is from the agency. It might not be in our end, but it might be a tech or a nursing assistant of private aid. It could be a agency, you know, unit Clark. There's just a variety of need out there, but I've always worked alongside some form of agency nurse, and, you know, I'm being inquisitive and wanting to figure out what's going on around me. I started asking questions, and, you know, one of the things that I wanted to learn pretty quickly is, Well, what's the benefit to you, too? Work for an agency and not have the security of a stable job Not have, you know, health insurance. Not have a 401 k not have, you know, the, um, the comfort and convenience of building a team and learning the doctors and learning the patient demographics in the area that you're taking care of and constantly having to learn something new and adjust. What's the benefit to that cause? Initially, it sounded like that would be, you know, very overwhelming and not something that a lot of people would be looking for, right? Um, but as I as I got to learn more about the role, the one word freedom kind of kept repeating itself. Freedom, freedom, freedom, freedom. And I'm like, What? I don't get that I thought making a good amount of money and getting into a groove and learning the process and becoming that go to resource is what brings that kind of sense of freedom and your job. But that's not what most agency nurses were looking for. Most agency nurses are one. They're competent, established and very comfortable in their skill set as a nurse. So they have to have at least a couple years of experience before an agency will even hire them. So there's that. Then they also have a variety of extra requirements that keeps them from being able to kind of conform to a traditional schedule, whether it's, you know, family that they have to take care of. You know, aging parents, they're back in school. Maybe they're nomads, and they don't live in one particular area, and they like to bounce around. Some people join agency and become agency nurse because they literally are on the adventure train. They just want to go to a different city for three months at a time and then bounce and then go to another city for three months at a time and then bounce. And so being an agency nurse really offers you that freedom should choose the schedule You wanna work with, pick and choose when you want to work, How much time you wanna have off in between Shit, you know, in between gigs. Um, and it's really a great way to supplement your income when you can't conform or, you know, provide an institution with, you know, um, a set schedule. And we all know in in health care it's there's a high need and you have to fight to have holidays off. You have to fight to have weekends off. You have to work almost every Monday in almost every Friday, because those are the hardest shifts to cover. Um, and as an agency nurse, if you negotiate, you know, from the beginning you can have a contract last 13 weeks, and I have to work any of those ships.
Alli:
12:47
Wow. Yeah, it is such a unique spot for nurses, and I'm glad that you kind of highlighted the types of people or that you know my benefit from this type of jobs. So tell me about that. How that worked out for you. Because I want to know about what you were focusing on. You went back to school. So tell me why you went back and what your what? Your goal. Waas.
Damion Jenkins:
13:07
Yeah, sure. So I mean, straight out of nursing school. Um, you know, one side once I got dropped off. You know, once I left the classroom setting of, like, the new orientation, which the nurse educators in every facility of ever work then has really done a great job of doing the on boarding. But once you actually hit the floor running, I feel like that's where nursing education has really kind of let the loose ends kind of go, and they're not tying it tightly. And just making sure that the on boarding, as is, is strict and crisp and clear as a classroom setting. And so I didn't feel, you know, supported and I didn't feel prepared. And you know less about me and more about other individuals is that I could also see that other people felt the same way. And so I just thought there has to be something better than this. And so, you know, I would come up with recommendations and, um, you know, potential solutions, and I would bring it to the attention of management. And, you know, I guess it was really difficult for me because I had 15 years of food and hospitality industry experience. I, you know, helped open, you know, tons of restaurants for a multi $1,000,000 corporation. I was front of the house manager, you know, lead trainer. I helped develop the training guys and curriculum for, like, the front of house staff, things like that. So, you know, working and training and dealing with people. It is not new to me, but was what was difficult about this? The nursing is that I was a new nurse and people treated me like a new nurse. And they said multiple times to me, Your new nurse, you don't really know what's going on. You don't really understand the complexities of everything. Just wait. You know, you have to go through the trenches before you can become an adviser or expert or, you know, really provide appropriate solution. And so, you know, when I really thought about it, I'm thinking, Well, the recommendations and solutions I'm offering really have nothing to do with nursing itself. But everything about just business management and training and education has absolutely nothing to do with nursing. The recommendations that were I was making had nothing to do with, like, skill or technique or knowledge. It was just all about process. And, um, so I just after a while of, you know, a good six months of being told Oh, your new nurse, you don't really know. I figured the only way that I could position myself to, you know, maybe be heard was to go back to school, get additional training and additional certification so that I could be enough. You know, an authority on the subject of education because that's the specific area with a nursing that I saw that there was kind of this gap. And so, you know, I went back to school for my master's degree in nursing education, and that was kind of the catalyst for me. Doing that on the agency thing happened again because I needed to do my practicum and, uh my institution I was working for couldn't accommodate the schedule. I needed to have off to do those practicum hours. And so that's why I chose to do agency, cause I was able to pick and choose my schedule around that.
Alli:
16:33
So tell me now, like fast forward to what you're doing now, are you? You're still working as an agency nurse, and then you're you've also got this business you're running. So tell me about that.
Damion Jenkins:
16:43
Yeah. So I actually haven't worked agency since August of last year 2018. I actually took a full time staff position as a nurse educator in the role of staff development at a large healthcare institution here in Baltimore. Because that was the one that kind of the last piece of the puzzle for the nurse educator role that I hadn't filled that I didn't have any experience in. And so when the opportunity came about for me to kind of do the staff development piece now, I was on the other end of the side that I saw I could make the most impact. It took me a while to get here, but I got there, and so you know although I have my business and I'll get to that in just a second. I really wanted to take this opportunity to get this experience so I can say yes, I've done it. Yes. You know, I've been able to help establish some some positive impact. And yes, now I have a clearer idea of what the barriers are. Maybe why I wasn't supported the way that I was supported. Or maybe why I was being told. You don't really understand. You're a new nurse. So I finally in that side of the spectrum and, um, my opinions are the same. Actually, they haven't changed from being on the other side. It's still the same thing, too, you know. And at the end of the day, it's they're not. Most companies are investing. The resource is necessary to beef up their education. The institution I'm working for now is an exception. They actually have invested a great deal into their education. Um, and we're doing some pretty amazing things, and I've heard of many other institutions doing similar. It might be a turning of the tide, if you will, but for like the last nine years, I really didn't see any any major improvements as far as the frontline staff, the nurses and nursing assistants at the bedside truly being supportive in a professional development aspect. In addition to regulatory requirements, in addition to increasing their comfort level with the technical skills, their ability to handle emergency situations, you know, emergency preparedness uh, some of the more difficult kind of administrative tasks that were being, you know, told that we have to manage conflict resolution skills, service, recovery, all of these things that they don't really teach a nursing school. And so, um, now that I'm on that side and I've been working on these projects for this past year, you know, I really feel that it's it's coming full circle and that, um, choosing should not go straight into my business full time. When I have the opportunity to do it over this past year is something that was really important, and I'm glad I did it, so I'm working full time with them. But coming up here soon at the end of March, I'm actually going to go down to just a point for, you know, which is to eight hour shifts a week because I am moving to New York City, so I'm not going to be in Baltimore anymore, and my boss doesn't want to lose me, and she wants me to continue working on some of the special projects that were doing. But I will be working the rest of the time solely on my business, which is kind of my passion and where I wanted to go with nursing education. And that's really to just help get more nurses into the workforce and to keep them in the workforce. That's my mission, John. And that's kind of where the nurse speak was born.
Alli:
20:26
Congratulations on that. I mean, that's so exciting. And I know like you didn't cut any corners. You did the work. What do you think it is? What? Why do you think there's that divide there?
Damion Jenkins:
20:36
I really think it comes down to Resource is when it comes to the gap between classroom and clinical. I think it's the resource is you know, we still in many ways function off of a grid. Um, you know, just a simple numbers grid. This is how many nurses you give for how many patients? Um, 99% of our country operates that way. And when you operate based off of the numbers grade, instead of a complexities grid or a strength space model or an acuity model or ah, variety of the other models that people have proposed, you get the same results. You get nurses who are overworked and who don't feel supported because they are tasked with, you know, doing 1000. You know, bedside care items. And it could be everything from literally hanging life saving medications and, you know, bagging patients and doing CPR to also handling some of the most basic, you know, activities of daily living that could be better managed if maybe they were more nursing assistance. Or maybe if we brought the L. P. N's back into the acute care setting and allowed them to work alongside the our ends to just have that the extra resource is so that they can spend more time doing the task that they need, um, and have a little bit more downtime to critically think and then to receive the education that the educators air trying to provide. So that's one of the That's one of the gaps that I see, and then the other gap that I see is that a lot of institutions aren't really investing in their education departments. They're not seeking out higher level degrees. They're not. First of all, they're not paying the educators what they deserve that. That's kind of my own assessment. And, you know, I'm not saying that for any particular company or institution, but just kind of across the board from the research that I've collected, You know, bedside nurses typically get paid more than the nurse educators. But the nurse educators have higher degrees. They put in more years. They are devoting themselves to enhancing the profession, making sure that we're meeting regulation and that we're constantly striving for quality improvement. So, you know, and from my experience in this past year, if something goes wrong with the practice at the bedside, it's always the educators that get a call, you know, so it's kind of like Ari. Where does the process change where education is supported more financially? There's more, more staff in the education department. They have a little bit more Ah, freedom for the teaching, allowing, you know, maybe a little bit of academic freedom, but also being able to, you know, follow the same kind of standard across the board. So standardization is another area that I find that a lot of health care institutions lack. So it's just, you know, me being the type of Lerner that I am always asking why always wanting to know exactly why I'm doing things and what the anticipated outcomes are. And what should I do if we don't meet those anticipated outcomes? This is where I've kind of found that we don't really have all the answers, Um, across the board. And so this past year, being on the staff development side of nursing education has really opened my eyes to, um, to both sides of the story, you know, from my side, feeling unsupportive and then from the facility side of not having the resources available. Um, you know, every educator I've ever had in the health care settings have always been, you know, for the most part, very helpful to their capability. But sometimes I would only see them like once a month. No, because they're just tasked with a whole bunch of administrative things that need to be done. But where are you allocating the time for the educators to really do that face time role modeling that face time demonstrations that auditing you know, the validation, the competencies. Um, you know your staff shouldn't see the educators once a year for competencies, and that's it. They shouldn't see the educators just because there's a new policy that's being rolled out. They shouldn't see the educators just because the state surveys coming
Alli:
24:58
right, they almost become. I mean, it's been a while since I've been in the hospital, but I do remember the feeling of they almost become like the police, where it's not exact, right? Yeah, so
Damion Jenkins:
25:08
and I don't want to be the police. I want to be one that the staff can trust, that they come to for answers, that they know when they're having a practice discrepancy, that they can get the the the demonstration or validation that they need to safely care for their patients. They should be able to come to me when they see practice issues when they I feel like there's potential neglect or abuse when they feel like you know they're not being appropriately managed or maybe being bullied because the educators are the facilitators for, you know, best practice. Most of our kind of titles or clinical practice education specialists. Something fancy like that, right? Well, that's exactly what it is. It's clinical practice, and we're specialists and education. So we should be able to, you know, help facilitate and streamline all of the clinical practice that's happening and all of the different facets that involved a clinical practice with the nursing staff. But often times were where, you know, caught up in meetings. And we're, you know, polling numbers out of charts. And we're doing other projects that take us away from the direct care staff who are going to make those life saving decisions when the time arises. And so this is one of the biggest gaps that I saw as a new nurse because when I had answers and my educator was busy doing other things and I'm being trained by a relatively new nurse herself, it's kind of like, Well, this is a disaster waiting to happen.
Alli:
26:45
So is that your goal with the nurse speak? Is that like to make more nurses that are asking the right questions and able to find the resource is and
Damion Jenkins:
26:54
yeah, so the nurse speak actually started as a blogged because I wanted to share kind of my perspective on certain issues and trends and practices. And when I first launched the block in 2015 it was really just kind of like, very broad, very kind of all over the place on Bennett kind of evolved into some inspirational stuff and then kind of highlighting what other nurses air doing. And then, you know, and then, as I started to kind of hone in on my niche, which is in clicks prep, Um, some of the articles have become more targeted towards, like the nursing student or like someone studying for the boards. But I still put out generalized content because my goal is is to share content that's going to be meaningful and impactful. And hopefully we'll save someone a little bit of stress or heartache home going through a particular process. So in any way that I can to help, you know, ease that process to develop those critical thinking skills to help you understand that there's more. There's more than one way to do something right. That's really my goal. And so, um, after having the blogger for several years and then getting lots of referrals from the school that I used to teach for as an adjunct faculty member for in Clacks Prep. I realized that in clicks prep was kind of my specialty, and it's It's where I really found my niche. And that's where that's where I'm moving forward with. But the nurse speak is focusing mainly on in clicks prep, but then also doing a variety of, you know, nurse content, writing, public speaking engagements, seminars, webinars and things of that nature
Alli:
28:39
said so exciting because, I mean, you're so right going from nursing school where you're just your full focus, really. Is this big scary in CLECs and like, you know, that's you're dreaming about it you're having nightmares about. And then once it's John, then you're like, Well, crap. Now I got to go get a job, get a job, and you're in this a whole new world, and then you gotta start all over. So, Thio, have someone like you lay it all out. You're I mean, it's like you're holding your hand, walking them through the entire process. It's gonna be okay, you graduate. And guess what, Davey. And still they're telling you which questions to ask where to find the resource is
Damion Jenkins:
29:18
Yeah, that's and that's one thing that I tell all of my in clicks prep clients is that you have me for a lifetime. I will become your lifetime a ready source. You know, if you are navigating a complicated situation at work, you know, maybe you're on boardings not going as planned. Maybe you feel like your boss is being mean or bullying. You are. Maybe your precept er doesn't seem to be quite qualified. Or maybe you're just not clashing with, you know, maybe you're clashing with them and not getting along with them. Um, you can always reach out to me and just say, Hey, this is something that's happening, you know? Can you give me your input for anyone who works with me for in clicks prep? That is something that I would do. It's complimentary. I enjoy helping. I'm obviously if you needed a more ah, larger project, some career trajectory type stuff, you know, then we can talk. But I'm not a career coach. That's not my specialty. I worked with tons of amazing career coaches out there. I'll drop a name if you don't mind. Keith Karlsson is probably one of the best career coaches out there for nurses, especially nurses who were kind of figuring out from the bedside what to do next. Um, he's a great resource out there, but yes, but that's always something that I can offer because in the nearly 10 years have been a nurse, I'm navigated through tons of different experiences, tons of different healthcare facilities. I worked with people from all over the country on DSO, you know, going through the process of graduating with my associates degree and then going all the way through my master's degree. There's just so many different experiences that I've gained that I know I can help Almost any situation, even if it's just lending an ear, allow its event and telling you that you're not crazy and that you know what you're going through is perfectly normal. And but there is always a better way of handling situations. So, you know, that's where my experience comes in. Because let me tell you what not to dio think, because I've made mistakes in the past by charging in my boss's office and demanding things or, you know, maybe not being a sensitive as you should be in certain situations. And, you know, I'm not a sensitivity expert. That's something I've been working on. Um, I'm a little bit more, um, matter of fact than some people like in some cases. But, you know, that's something that comes with experience. You learn that finesse and you learn how to be very sensitive to other people's feelings, even though, if you feel like the feeling shouldn't be a part of the situation. But you should always consider those things. The's very complex situations just really take experience. And that's where my client's could really benefit from keeping in touch with May
Alli:
32:15
right? And I mean, it's it's such a great thing that you are so matter of fact, because had you been, you know, maybe on the more sensitive side to begin with, you probably wouldn't be where you are today helping everyone else that you're helping. So I mean, with all the work that you're doing, not only are you guiding these nurses into their dream jobs, but you're also creating more capable mentors in the process. Really exciting. So thank you. Yeah. No, thank you. So, if there's nursing students that want to know more about the ink Lex prep and then, you know, even just with the follow up mentoring, where can they find U.
Damion Jenkins:
32:48
S so I can be found at the nurse speak dot com. That's kind of the central hub for everything the nurse speaks. So all of the service that I offer, including in classics prep my blog's They're all of my contact information is there. They can also find me on the Facebook at the nurse speak. I have to Facebook groups the nurse speak Facebook Group and also the help I failed the ink Lex Facebook Group. I can also be found on Instagram at dinner Speak and Twitter at the Nurse. Speak, um, and anyone professionally who wants the link up with me. I'm on lengthen as Damian Jenkins, So you confined beat, and then I also have a business page on Lengthened the Nurse speak as well, so I'm very accessible online. In 2020 I'm again with the decrease and working hours for another institution, and I could work on my business. Anyone who's following me can expect to see a lot Maur content come out a lot more thoughtful, carefully curated content because I'm gonna have the time to spend, you know, days and days really creating the kind of content that not only I've been wanting to design and put out there, but to also get more feedback from my followers on what they want more off, which is something I haven't been able to do this past year.
Alli:
34:10
So what are you most excited about moving forward into this New year? 2020 year of the nurse? What excites you the most?
Damion Jenkins:
34:16
I think you know the thing that excites me the most is all of the connections that I'm gonna be making just having that time to make those connections. Whether it's, you know, more clients, whether it's meeting people are conferences. Whether it's, you know, you know, when I launched those first couple webinars that I'm gonna be doing in the early part of 2020 just making these new connections, getting to know more people and just really being able to, you know, not only share my expertise but also learn from them because I learned from every single person I connect with, You know, if I'm not learning something from individuals, I don't feel like I'm really you know, connecting with them appropriately. It shouldn't be about just everything I have to say. It should also be reciprocal. I should be learning about them and taking in the consideration for their worth their journey, what they dio meeting them where they're at is really important to me. So I'm just really looking forward to the connections and just seeing where it goes from there. Because, really, the work that I'm doing is all about passion. It's ah, you know, hopefully will be lucrative. You know, that's everyone's goal is to make money in the work that they dio. Um, But I think as long as I'm happy and the bills are paid, it's just gonna be full full steam ahead for me.
Alli:
35:39
Well, I'm so excited for you. I know it's gonna be a great year, and I'm I'm gonna be right there along with you. I'm gonna be watching rooting for you. One more question. If there was something you could tell the nursing student version of yourself, what would it be?
Damion Jenkins:
35:53
That would be that you don't have to know everything. You know, Every nursing student spends so much time stressing sometimes to their detriment about mastering every detail, and that's not what makes a good nurse. What makes a good on Earth is to be able to get the bigger picture, to be able to critically think, to be able to ask those questions that I mentioned earlier, like, what are the anticipated outcomes? And then what do we do if we don't meet those anticipated outcomes, but to try to, like, really just cram in every single lab, value every single disease, process, every single medication instead of kind of understanding the more broader topics? Um, I think that that creates a lot of unnecessary anxiety. And I know from the in clicks perspective, understanding how to critically think and understanding the bigger picture is far more important than knowing all the details. You know, because learning the disease processes in the medications and the lab values come with time and experience and that kind of repetitive motion that you're going through, but being able to stop and say I don't know what I should do next. So this is what I need to do to find out and then also say this doesn't look normal, so I should further investigate. Those are the types of things that make good nurses because you can't remember everything from nursing school and you won't remember everything from nursing school. And you could be a nurse for 100 years. And you're still not going to know everything that you learn to nursing school because it all depends on where you're working and how much exposure you get to that content. So going back, I could have saved myself hours of frantic studying and cramming because I thought, like every other nursing student, that you have to know every single thing,
Alli:
37:55
right. Thank you for your words of wisdom. It's so true, you don't have to know everything. You just have to know how to ask the right questions and figure it out. And that's Ah. Then I guess one of the best places to start is with you, Damien. So thank you so much for sharing with us today. And, um, yeah, I I'm actually a little bit nervous. I am blown away, but I'll buy all you've been talking about, and I can't wait to see what 2020 brings. So I'm excited if all along and watch you do what you do Great things. So thanks again, Thank
Damion Jenkins:
38:22
you. It's my pleasure. And, you know, just again, you know, I really like what you're doing here with the goal of this podcast to just really, you know, let let nurses and nursing students know that there's just so much out there for nursing.
Alli:
38:40
Thank you again to Damian for sharing with us. His role as an inn plex, prep expert, content writer, educational consultant and CEO of the nurse. Please check out the nurse speak dot com to see the amazing work he's doing. If you haven't yet, please subscribe to the RN professions podcast. Follow me at our end professions on instagram and please join in on the conversation. We've got a lot to talk about. And if you would like to be on the podcast to share your specialty and nursing journey, we love to hear it. Please connect with me at Alley at our in professions dot com. That's a l l I at r and B r o m e S s i o n s dot com Thanks for tuning in
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