RN Professions

Ep. 8: CA Prison Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Board Certified

January 27, 2020 Season 1 Episode 8
RN Professions
Ep. 8: CA Prison Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Board Certified
Chapters
RN Professions
Ep. 8: CA Prison Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Board Certified
Jan 27, 2020 Season 1 Episode 8
Alli Merrell, Steffan Weiner

In this episode I speak with Steffan Weiner who is a Psychiatric- Mental Health Board Certified Nurse Practitioner who also has a degree in genetics. Steffan walks us through his journey of why he decided not to go to med school, his devastating move across the country and his ultimate success in creating a profession for which he is a top earner in the nation as a psychiatric nurse practitioner in a  level 4 maximum security prison in California. 

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode I speak with Steffan Weiner who is a Psychiatric- Mental Health Board Certified Nurse Practitioner who also has a degree in genetics. Steffan walks us through his journey of why he decided not to go to med school, his devastating move across the country and his ultimate success in creating a profession for which he is a top earner in the nation as a psychiatric nurse practitioner in a  level 4 maximum security prison in California. 

Alli:
00:00
You are listening to the RN Professions podcast episode number eight. In this episode, I speak with Stephan Weiner, who is a psychiatric mental health board certified nurse practitioner who just also happens to have a degree in genetics. Stephan walks us through his journey of why he decided not to go to med school, his devastating move across the country and his ultimate success in creating a profession for which he is a top earner in the nation. As a psychiatric nurse practitioner in a Level four maximum security prison, nurses seriously have the best job. Hi, I'm Allie. Join me each week is I interview nurses across the country to discuss their current nursing roles and responsibilities, schedules, salaries and so much more. Whether you're a nursing student fearing that dreaded in CLECs and established nurse looking for a change of scenery, or are simply curious about the wonderful world of registered nursing, this podcast is for you.
Steffan Weiner:
01:05
I'm doing well. How are you?
Alli:
01:06
I'm good. I'm good. I'm so excited to talk to you. I'm so grateful that you're taking the time to kind of give us all the details. This is this isn't exciting thing to talk about?
Steffan Weiner:
01:16
Yeah. I mean, uh, I'm excited to talk about it. Haven't really talked much about it myself, actually.
Alli:
01:20
Really? Oh, my goodness. I was thinking that you kind of had been doing this just with all your prep in and how you laid everything else so nicely.
Steffan Weiner:
01:27
No, um, I hadn't. But it's stuff I'm interested in talking about that stuff I think a lot about and I liked it. So I think it's a good thing that you're doing teach other people about different professions that are out there Because this is one of the things that I would have liked to have known I had. I, um you know, I had the opportunity. Um, originally, I think of my course. Could have
Alli:
01:54
Yeah, but at the same time, I mean, it's so interesting because you obviously a very smart man, and you're driven to, you know, excel and succeed and all that that difficulty on your own. Even being as smart as you are, I think he's gonna be really refreshing for everybody who hears because we all get those. You know, those failures Where how you love how you said you were devastated and then to have figured it out. Still, you know, I think that's good. I think it's good for people to hear that. It's not easy for all. You know, smart people, always all the time.
Steffan Weiner:
02:22
Sometimes people who have had a lot of success and, you know, they'll see some factor in their life where they kind of looked out. Well, I like to think of it as making your own luck. Um, if you put in the effort, you tough out there, too. Eventually accomplished big things. You know, eventually things are gonna work out for you, even if a few of them don't. So, uh, in this world, you have to make your own luck, and education is a huge part of that.
Alli:
02:57
So, Stephan, um, can you please tell us what your current are in profession is and how long he's been a nurse?
Steffan Weiner:
03:04
Sure, I'm a psychiatric nurse practitioner in a Level four max security prison in California. And like you, I graduated from nursing school in 2009 from present state. I worked as an RN for about four years on, and I've been a nurse practitioner for about six years.
Alli:
03:22
Can I ask you real quick? What does level four mean?
Steffan Weiner:
03:25
So there are different levels. Depending on how many points these guys get. They may go to a specific prison that is of a higher acuity for more dangerous criminals and more criminal activity. At any rate, if they get above ah, a certain number of points, then they go to a higher level acuity. I am no level force I security in the state.
Alli:
03:53
So can you tell us just like an overview of, um of your you know, when you left nursing school, where did you go from there? What what different nursing jobs have you had that had fled you to where you are now? You've got a unique drink. So why don't you tell us about the your first experience with with college on? Well, yeah, we'll go that way.
Steffan Weiner:
04:12
Um, sure, My first round of college was UC Davis, where I completed AA degree in genetics in 2005. After that, I worked for a year in a hospital. It's a lab assistant. My intent was to go to medical school originally, but my father, who's in overdue i n it discouraged it because of frustrations related dealing with insurance companies. On my mother's was a radiologist. She set me up to Shep Shadow with a nurse. A nest fittest at a local hospital. Um, and with the intention of becoming a nurse anaesthetist, I got a second B s and nursing at present State on. I graduated a few 1009. Um, I found a job in an I C. U rabbit out of nursing school because the anesthesia programs require 1 to 2 years of ice you experience prior to entrance. Ah, and it was a special program for new graduates that I got into in upstate New York at Strong Memorial Hospital. I, after moving all the way from California to New York within a couple of months strong, determined that I was unsuccessful in the ice. You setting on? I was dumbfounded because that was really the first time I had a major failure in my life, and I was kind of scrambling to figure out what to do next. I felt like I had completed V s and from UC Davis, which took five years, and, uh, I put in another three years for my GSN yet it. Nothing to show for that at that point. Um, and I was desperate. Um, I went to see a career counselor at the University of Rochester, uh, to get some ideas about what to do next. Um, and he had bean list out the top 10 desires for a job in order of priority. And the number one thing I wanted I'd always wanted was, ah, $100,000 income. I don't remember the other nine that I listed.
Alli:
06:19
I like that.
Steffan Weiner:
06:21
Yeah, it is. And all I remember it's that he told me my number one goal was ridiculous and that I should reevaluate my priorities. He told me that I was being unreasonable wanting a job that paid so much. Um, and I was absolutely devastated, totally crushed, because this has been my financial goal. Its wings, I can remember. And having given up on my dream to become a nurse anaesthetist on, I spoke with a friend who was also struggling in the program on, and we discussed what to do next. And she, uh, asked me what I like what I liked in nursing school. And I told her that I really loved my psych rotation in school, but I couldn't do much with it. Um, I never intended to settle as an RN er from the beginning, so being a psych nurse wouldn't work for me. She quickly asked, Why Don't just become a psych nurse practitioner. So I responded. You What the heck is that? I had no idea what that was, and she informed me that I could prescribe and diagnose just like a physician. And I could work in a field actually enjoy while making some good money. And I couldn't believe my ears when she said that If I'd only known at, uh from the beginning, I would have never flown all the way out to New York in the first place. And ah immediately began looking for a sidecar and job because you need a year of experience to become a psych and pee on. And I started working in a facility for adolescents. Uh, then begin applying, uh, to nurse practitioner schools. And I decided to go back to California to attend Cal State Long Beach I, working as a sidecar and an inpatient psych ward while I was a nurse, practice while I was a nurse practitioner school on after graduating in 2013 became for certified adult psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner, Uh, and that board certification was through the NCC. Um, I worked in multiple settings, a psych and P so far I started off in the nursing homes, which is a good place for beginners on dhe. Then I transitioned into the outpatient office setting, which is really good for a vast array of different patients from different ages and backgrounds. So that is really broad experience there that was really good for, you know, being able to adapt to other potential positions in the future. I've also, uh, worked with adolescence, uh, which is the most challenging population, actually, because they become our that they can come along with a lot of chaos from being a teenager. Everybody is pretty nutty as a teenager, usually, I guess, and ah, that was all calm. Pounded by the psychiatric ailments, often involving a recent trauma from abuse and as an adult, psych and P, I'm legally required to see patients who are at least, uh, 13 years old. Now, out of these second Pease air, coming out with life span degrees and getting credentials that way, allowing them to see patients of all ages. Um, becoming credential. This is technically optional. However, I actually recommend it because not doing so seriously limits your employment options on. Additionally, I learned as much or more studying for board certification, and they did while I was in N P school.
Alli:
10:11
So can you kind of tell me a little bit about why you think, um, why you maybe didn't fit right with icy or why I see you didn't fit right for you. And then And maybe what is different about you were the type of personality that you have that works better as the psych nurse. Sure. Well, you know, I never
Steffan Weiner:
10:33
really liked the idea of working with patients you know so so intimately as to the point where you know you're having to clean up excrement and you being involved with starting Ivy's. I didn't really enjoy the blood, the aspect macho or or, you know, the body fluids. And, you know, it was just kind of a means to an end there that I had to go through. So my heart really wasn't in it, and I was just struggling in the programming successful at that? Um, and I had always done I never would have done that the first place if if I had known that the second key option was available. So you know that the psych thing really speaks more to me. Uh, because I enjoy conversing with the patients, and I can help them in a personal way in a nice you know, they almost always, uh, not always, but almost always totally incapacitated. You're not interacting. Um, any mental sense at all. So this is kind of like the poulet are opposite.
Alli:
11:45
Yeah, definitely. You're getting pretty intimate. Just not with as much with the excrement and bodies from a mental aspect. Okay, well, that makes total sense. So I think it's great that you're pointing out that you don't have to love needles and love blood and love all of these things to become a nurse. I was just I'm a conversation with a girl who said it was her lifelong dream to become a nurse, but blood makes her woozy. I thought, Well, you don't necessarily have to work with blood every single day. You know means to an end, right? You can toughen up get through it and then and then go on to your dreams. So that means that distinction.
Steffan Weiner:
12:23
Yeah, I think you can get through that sort of thing. It's kind of like they talk about nurses who become hardened when they work tonight e r for long periods of time and eventually they get over the blood thing or excrement thing, and they just don't even think twice about it.
Alli:
12:40
Yeah, they go take a break, eat lunch, come back
Steffan Weiner:
12:43
and do it all over again. Thes things you can get used to. Um although, although, I would say, um, I never really would have had much of a love for it. Um, okay, like I do with psychiatry. So, um, you know, it's different strokes for different folks. I guess
Alli:
13:01
so. It's it's really interesting that you have always been interested in the psych thing, but you never knew that the role of nurse practitioner within the site field was was even a things to think about. And I I want to point that out just because that's the whole reason that you know this podcast is exists is because so many nursing students I don't even know what is available to them. And so they spend years and years and years doing something else Realizing well, this thing I wanted all along it's possible on here's how to do it. So, um, thank you for sharing your you know, your journey where, you know, you might call failures, but it's all leading to somewhere better. So thank you for sharing. That s so Can you tell us a little bit about like, your job description? Like maybe a day to day or what your role looks like within within your nurse practitioner Within the prison
Steffan Weiner:
13:50
right S o. I work a za 10 99 contractor with the vending company that directly contracts with the prison through a management company on and for my work, I essentially prescribed and diagnosis just like us. I primarily work in the administration administrative segregation unit, which is essentially the jail within the prison. Usually my patients are there because they've been misbehaving, but sometimes it's for sometimes. It's for, ah, safety concerns as well, unless they're actually, uh, in the cell everywhere my patients go within the S u. Ah, there. Handcuffed, uh, and my patients when I see them, they're in a therapeutic module and essentially four by four foot cage, Uh, surrounded by it is, Ah, middle seat that's grounded to the bottom, and it's surrounded by plexi glass on the side so they can't spit at me or gas me during an assessment. A gassing is an attack with bodily fluids, which, as we well know, is not my cup of tea. Nobody wants to get wallet with bodily fluids, obviously, but I'm particularly queasy about, um so yeah, anyway,
Alli:
15:17
think like the prisoners that are misbehaving that have to goto sex. Step Joe. Wow. So it's like prison Plus,
Steffan Weiner:
15:23
Yeah, it's prison plus Exactly Yes, it's extra security precautions associate. With that, it's a bit more isolated.
Alli:
15:34
Can I ask you a question? Just specific to that? Because I'm totally picturing Have you ever seen Black List with uh oh, shoot. What's the same? Oh, my gosh, you're making his name. But it's like they're in this box, this plexiglass box, and I'm just picked picturing this sterile environment cold. Um, how do you how do you How do you act therapeutically in a place that is so cold and harsh and isolating and step, It separates you. And I mean, I know that's your job. I understand that you've been trained to do that, but, you know, for nurses that are trying to envision what it's like to care for bad guys in a harsh environment like, how do you How do you approach that? S o I tend to
Steffan Weiner:
16:18
treat everyone the same, whether they're a hardened criminal criminal or they're, you know, an eight year old grandma. Um, I don't tend to judge bait, or I try not to judge based on the environment, although, of course, bias is difficult to avoid it in some circumstances. But specifically I'll avoid getting too much detail about, uh, their cases and, uh, you know what? They're actually therefore because they can really buy us your assessment and your treatment. Um, so I tend thio just kind of weed all that out. You know, honestly, these guys a lot of them have been there for many, many years, so they're used to this type of environment. A lot of times, the guy's in A s. You have been the issue many times. They kind of know how it works. Uh, and you know, uh, the same guys that I see in a S u I might see ah on the yard if I'm working on the yard one day and they're not in a cage in its, you know, pretty much the same thing. Um, as faras the assessment goes, or at least we try and make it. We try and normalize it as much as possible, which may seem a bit bizarre, you know, from someone coming from the outside, you know, looking at this situation where somebody's in a one of these therapeutic modules and I'm kind of sitting there, eh? Interviewing them. But, you know, we make through the best we can and try and normalize it. It may seem a bit inhumane to conduct psychiatric assessments this way. However, these safety precautions really are necessary when interacting with the potentially violent criminals who have actively been misbehaving. Um, so you know, even though it is a potential caveat for yeah therapeutic relationship, it really is necessary for safety purposes. And I even have to wear a stab proof vest. And I carry an alarm and a whistle when seeing the patients you know, for safety purposes. So there are a lot of things they're potentially different than you might see in another psychiatric setting. That way for safety.
Alli:
18:26
Yeah, definitely. Let's ease. Yes. So how How how many patients do you see a day? And then you kind of talked a little bit about seeing them in this module versus seeing them, um, in the yard. How does that How does that feel?
Steffan Weiner:
18:39
Yeah. So, uh, when working on the yard, I see patients with a correctional officer nearby to run my line. Uh, and actually, they run the line A cz. Well, also in the A S U. But of course, they have to be handcuffed everywhere they go there. I see about 6 to 12 patients a day, depending on if I'm seeing new evils or follow ups. New evils tend to be about twice as long as follow ups anywhere in psychiatry for mid management purposes. Or you know that I may get a few less if patients transfer out any particular day. You know, especially in the A s. You There's a lot of turnovers. So, um, I may see you fewer that way. Um, but this'd is, ah, a lot fewer patients that we might see any outpatient setting, I mean an outpatient. I remember seeing anywhere between 20 to 40 patients in a day. I would have 15 minute follow ups and 30 minute newly valves, and they would just be in and out of the office. This is a much more relaxing environment. May find that a bit odd that I'm talking about Level four max security prison being much more relaxing than an outpatient setting. But honestly, that, uh, e reduced patient load does make this job a lot easier. And really, you can't have that sort of volume in a prison setting because these guys have to go back and forth from the yard across the yard to get to the office. You know, they get let out of the cells they are. Some of you have to be escorted if they're in the issue. That so you really can't see as many patients that way, which really creates an environment for the practitioner. That's a lot more, uh, calming, in a sense, because you don't have to rush to see tons of patients. If patients refuse to goto up to an appointment, I have to go to the cell blocks to see the patients to get a brief visual and verbal assessment. I e time these during the count s O that the majority of the inmates are locked in their cells. That reduces the chances of being assaulted and makes it easier for me to find my patients. They are capable of committing Unsalted via gassing through the cell. Bore, of course. Uh, so it's totally safe, but
Alli:
21:06
they have as many a cz many safety precautions as possible. It sounds like is what your head within. Well,
Steffan Weiner:
21:13
within reason. I mean, we're not strapping these guys down. I mean, I wanted everything to be extremely safe, you know, with these violent criminals were, you know, often assaulting each other, often stabbing each other, manufacturing weapons, things like that. You know, the we're not chaining them up to the walls here, right? I mean, I guess in theory it could be really inhumane, and we could keep everybody really, really safe, right? So especially in California, we tend to have a lot of leeway, as I understand with that, uh, for human rights issues, you know? So they're free to walk around the yards and, you know, if I'm assuming they're not in the issue. Um, so it's a little less restrictive that way, and it could be potentially assault of, but yeah, you know this Correctional officers around. For safety purposes, we have alarms and things like that readily available.
Alli:
22:07
So within with psych patients and with psych patients who are prisoners, how do you determine who's who's legitimately needing your help and who's kind of gaming the system?
Steffan Weiner:
22:21
Right? There is a lot of that. With came the system in the ER In this setting, a lot of these guys will, uh, fain psychosis, For example, um, they'll they'll tell you that they have that they're hearing voices and they're seeing things. But in reality, Ah ah, lot of these guys are just, uh, kind of telling you that. So they get sedating medications, or they might say they want a certain antidepressants. It's very stimulating because they want to get a jolt. Um, but there is really a psychosis and their Israel anxiety and real depression in prison. I mean, the prison itself can cause mental disorders. Um, just the environment can can result in it. You have to weed that out. Ah, and you know, I'll ask him certain questions like, uh, you know, there's a certain quality to psychosis. For example, how many voices do you hear her? Well, you know, if they give me a number, that should be repeatable later If I assess it later. Uh, male or female? How many are male having your female? Uh, if you see things eyes in color or black and white visual hallucinations are always in color age of starting schizophrenia. If I ask how old you were when it started when when the voices started. I typically for males, it's, uh, between 15 and 25 years old s So they tell me it started at age six. You know, it's a red flag, although a lot of people who have been physically or sexually abused leaving your voices all of those of a very different quality eso and any rate a lot of these guys will try and use thes medications is a currency. For example, a try. Let the whole, you know oh, are some other psychiatric medications. They might try and use these drugs to sell for some soups or something. They really do use this currency. So there's an intensive there to get some of these meds from you. And you have to be careful about who your, uh, prescribing what? To, uh, and why?
Alli:
24:44
Yeah, that that makes a lot of sense. I, unfortunately, had firsthand experience. Well, not first and a second hand. I I wasn't a prisoner, but I was visiting in prison, and I've I've kind of seen how how lovely that could be and how desperate they can be. Um, four for drugs, for whatever. Maybe they can. You know, whether they came in with a an addiction or they acquired one in there. That's I mean, it's so sad. So how do you moving Moving from that? How can you monitor, you know, with with drugs being available in prison? Um, you prescribe? You
Steffan Weiner:
25:19
sure so, Well, depending on what kind of drugs, right? They may be of using this psych meds that I'm giving them. And we can use lab tests, blood tests to see if they're taking the lapse that the medications that I give them on. And also, if there found cheek ing the medications, you know, I could prescribe it as a crush and float, Uh, so they kind of crush it up and put on top of water on having take it that way. Or they could be liquid form and for some meds or injectable form for some. Ah, and for street drugs, which is a huge problem in the prison setting, they found it extremely difficult to keep the street drugs out of prison. A huge portion of my patients are drug and alcohol addicts, actually, and many of them have hepatitis or other pathogens related to drug use. These factors can have an effect on how I prescribe meds. Um, I want to prevent my patients from using the drugs I prescribe to get high, obviously, while still addressing very real mental health concerns and urine tests. Or they often have to be ordered but are typically refused. Um, the count before in your Department of Corrections is actually rolling out a massive drug rehabilitation program in hopes that this will alleviate some of the problem. I mean, I believe they're putting in about 400 million into this program to try and deal with some of the, uh, drug abuse in the prison system.
Alli:
26:54
Can you tell me a little bit more about the interdisciplinary treatment team meeting all of the people that take care of the that are caring for the prisoners.
Steffan Weiner:
27:05
Yes. So the interdisciplinary treatment team is one of my responsibilities of the prison Where, um, there's a meeting that allows for various members involved in the patients care to come together with the inmate to discuss his treatment plan and to answer any questions he may have about mental health care or custody issues. At the meeting, we have representatives from psychiatry, psychology, psychology, rather medical and custody.
Alli:
27:37
So what is custody technically me? Because I'm thinking Children and their parents. So what is it? No eso custody
Steffan Weiner:
27:42
meeting like issues related to Ah, there, there the corrections problems, like, you know, release date or how many points they have or or ah, any legal issues they may want to discuss. That can be an answer we have. We have a correctional officer representative um, who's there to answer any of those questions that they may have for that?
Alli:
28:12
Okay. Wow, that's amazing. So there's quite a quite a few professionals that are taking care of the inmates, making sure that they're rehabilitated and ready to go for their release date, right? It's Yeah, you guys are all coming together with your own professional opinions on where they're at when it comes to their really state. I'm assuming to make sure that there
Steffan Weiner:
28:31
yeah, absolutely a collaboration is a huge part of this s so well, uh, so in the prison, we've referred to psychologists and social workers as clinicians. The clinicians may really very important information regarding a potential need for medication and adjustments. Sometimes aspects of treatment with psychiatric meds may interfere with medical treatments. Sometimes there's overlap between, uh, treatments. And, uh, a decision has to be made to determine who will be responsible for particular medication.
Alli:
29:11
So tell me what your what your schedule is work, life, balance, that type of thing. How many days were in that, uh, in the prisons? And how how does that go with you being married and having a child,
Steffan Weiner:
29:21
right? Eso I average about 55 hours of work per week, and I drive an additional 14 hours per week. On top of that, I put in 10 hours per workday. A 10 hour shift is a really great option available to many psych nurse practitioners. 10 hour shifts potentially allow youto have Ah, four day work week. Ah, and increase the percentage of the day, Uh, that you're earning money? Um, helping to mitigate some of the time lost from a long drive on most prisons. Air rural are really rural. So unless you plan to live in the middle of nowhere, you have to drive a bit. Um, my commute is ah, about an hour and 15 minutes each way because I drive, uh, because I work and drive so much, I suppose there isn't much work life balance for me. Honestly, Um, and because I have a child now, Ah, I'll probably cut back to about 50 hours per week or so in your future.
Alli:
30:30
And it's totally up to you to do that because of the way that you were positioned as a 10 99. Right?
Steffan Weiner:
30:35
Right. One of the best things about being a 10 99 or owning an s corporation as I do is that I can essentially get to make my own schedule, which is really nice. And I have no one telling me Ah, when I can take time off of work, as long as I give him at least two weeks notice Essentially, I get a lot of freedom with my schedule. So I at least that's how it's been up until recently with the passage of California Assembly Bill five, which has the potential to affect the rest of the country. Actually, most nurse practitioners will no longer be able will no longer be able to work is ah, temp 99. Despite our preference and the higher earning potential associated with being 10 9 right, working at the prison, However, I'm actually able Thio be an independent contractors so I can work a 10 99. And I'm an independent contractor in the truest sense because I do not work directly for the prison. Uh, and the vending company I contract with does not spot by my patients. Ironically, both psychiatrists and psychologists were given exemptions under Assembly Bill five. So nearly everyone the psych and P works with they aren't penalized. What actually happens with this new law remains to be determined, but it is surrounded by a lot of controversy affecting people really don't want.
Alli:
32:14
When will we see this rollout e. I mean, is it hasn't
Steffan Weiner:
32:17
rolled technically throwed out. My understanding is, uh, that that it's gone into effect. Although I don't think there's been much adaptation by employers yet. There's certainly a lot of legal battles surrounding this thing right now. Um, I know it affected the trucking industry significantly, which, uh, you know, what about? I'm digressing a little bit, but my point is, um it remains to be determined. I mean, they kind of cherry picked certain professions almost randomly. It seems that aren't going to be impacted by this law. And the fact that it affects the nurse practitioners is, frankly, a bit bizarre. I'm not really sure where this is going. Going to actually, um, be implemented by all employers. Were will the future will tell, but it's certainly affecting a lot of us negatively because, you know, 10 99 employees, they all things considered with including benefits and everything. 10 99 employees actually make about 25% more on average. Some.
Alli:
33:28
So that's that will likely be a very big change. So as it stands now, what is your compensation look like compared to other nursing
Steffan Weiner:
33:37
rolls? So the compensation for a psych nurse practitioner is it significantly surpasses that of any other nurse practitioner type. Um personally, I'm one of the highest paid nurse practitioners in the world. However, a lot of that has to do with the number of hours I put it in 2019. I probably made about three times what the average nurse practitioner makes and about twice what. Thea what a psychiatric nurse practitioner mixed. So after working, ah, 40 hours in a week, I get paid time and 1/2 for overtime at the prison. And since I averaged about 55 hours per week, a good portion of my pays overtime while in prison, then does pay more than the norm. There are some outpatient jobs available out there that do pay similarly without all the additional potential risk assault, although there's always some but less, um, I should specify, you know there's an option toe work for the prison directly as a W two employees rather than a 10 99. But again, the compensations significantly left.
Alli:
34:50
So with that real quick, So how would you go about doing the 10 99? Would you need to look for a specific vending company to work with? And how would someone go about finding those companies? Oh, there's a
Steffan Weiner:
35:01
lot of ways to do it. So if you're gonna work for the prison, you need a vending company. You can find other jobs out there, like locals agencies that can get you jobs, which are typically 10 99 historically, until potentially recently with Assembly Bill five. But you can find these jobs you know directly with a new office. Um, typically, like an outpatient psychiatry office May may haria as a 10 99 employees. Essentially, you're working as an independent contractor. Um, so you know, there's a lot of ways to be o navigate that most most employers want to hire you as a 10 99 because they don't have to pay is much in taxes. If you're 10 99 and higher income professionals tend to be 10 wannabe 10 90 nines because they get certain tax exemptions and they contend to make more money that way. Ah, and they're not required to do certain things like take ah, lunch break in the middle of the day, for example, that's meant legally mandated for W two. I believe don't quote me on that. I'm not positive, but I believe that's how it is. I've never worked W too, But, um, I don't have to, uh Ah. And here to things like that, Um, Eso At any rate, I'm a pretty aggressive drop job hunter. When I do job, look for jobs. I actually, uh, you know, have my resume on. Indeed. And, uh, I think nursing jobs dot com is one of them. Um, there many job hunting sites out there. I stay in pretty frequent contact with job hunting sites in order to get e mails from them, Things like that. So I'm always in the know with regard to what? Psych nurse practitioners air getting paid. Um
Alli:
37:02
so smart. It's such a good idea. Thank you, Stephan, for sharing with us your role as a psychiatric nurse practitioner in a level for maximum security prison. Please join us as our conversation continues in part to where we discuss finances, investing, budgeting and making sense of it all. If you haven't yet, please subscribe to the RN professions podcast. Follow me at our end professions on instagram, and please join in on the conversation. We've got a lot to talk about. And if you would like to be on the podcast to share your specialty and nursing journey. We'd love to hear it. Please connect with me at alley at our in professions dot com. That's alli@rnprofessions.com Thanks for tuning in.
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