RN Professions

Ep. 10: Executive Nurse Adviser

February 02, 2020 Season 1 Episode 10
RN Professions
Ep. 10: Executive Nurse Adviser
Chapters
RN Professions
Ep. 10: Executive Nurse Adviser
Feb 02, 2020 Season 1 Episode 10
Alli Merrell, Dr. Joyce Batchellor

In this episode I have the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Joyce Batcheller who is an Executive Nurse Advisor with The Center for the Advancement of Healthcare Professionals and is responsible for the development and delivery of two Chief Nursing Officer Academies.

Dr. Batcheller is an innovative healthcare leader known for her ability to transform nursing and improve patient outcomes and inspires nurses and other healthcare professionals to reach their full potential. She gives some wonderful advice on how to step out and create positive change and she shares with us some exciting changes coming to the nursing industry in 2020.


Show Notes Transcript

In this episode I have the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Joyce Batcheller who is an Executive Nurse Advisor with The Center for the Advancement of Healthcare Professionals and is responsible for the development and delivery of two Chief Nursing Officer Academies.

Dr. Batcheller is an innovative healthcare leader known for her ability to transform nursing and improve patient outcomes and inspires nurses and other healthcare professionals to reach their full potential. She gives some wonderful advice on how to step out and create positive change and she shares with us some exciting changes coming to the nursing industry in 2020.




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Alli:
00:00
In this episode, I have the pleasure of speaking with Dr Joyce Bachelor, who is an executive nurse adviser with a Center for the Advancement of Health Care professionals and is responsible for the development and delivery of two chief nursing officer academies. Dr. Bachelor is an innovative health care leader known for her ability to transform nursing and improve patient outcomes. And she inspires nurses and other health care professionals to reach their full potential nurses. Seriously, have the best job. Hi, I'm Allie. Join me each week is I interview nurses across the country to discuss their current nursing roles and responsibilities, schedules, salaries and so much more. Whether you're a nursing student hearing that dreaded in cliques and established nurse looking for a change of scenery or are simply curious about the wonderful world of registered nursing. This podcast is for you. Hi. Hi, Joyce. There you are. I can hear you now. How are you doing?
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
01:07
I'm doing well. Thank you. I just lost my voice built that I'm doing pretty good. Can you hear me?
Alli:
01:13
I can I Hopefully you've had a chance to kind of look into the are in professions podcast. But, um, the point with the podcast really is just to educate, just like you're doing with your all about nursing show, which I got to to look at and and listen to a couple of those episodes. So I think we have a similar mission. So I'm excited to hear, like, everything that you have to share, because I know that you've you've been You've been at this for some time, so I just want to learn from us.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
01:42
I should be happy to share what I'm doing in ways to cross, you know, um, advertise, cetera. Happy to do that, too, because I think that's really cool. So what would you like to know?
Alli:
01:55
So let's start with why did you become a nurse? And what is your current role?
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
02:02
So, um, I became a nurse. Was that when I was at when I was five years old, I was crossing the street between parked cars and got by a truck, so I ended up in the hospital for quite a while, and he'll back in. The technology is not what it is today. But I had a body cast son from waist down for about 10 weeks. But my I remember people didn't really talk to you and your kid. They kind of treated you like you didn't know what was going on, but I just People would come in and out and not really explain things. And at that point, they didn't let parents stay. So except for like, a few minutes on the hour, Which is why I have such passion for open visiting hours. So, um, they took blood, and then they gave me blood. And I just remember crying because I thought My God, they didn't like my blood to give me a better blood or something. And finally, a nurse came in that actually spent time and explain things to me. And then you've got a candy stripers come play cards and divert all activities and all kinds of something. Her name was Joyce and I about I could be, like her make a difference in someone's life. So that happened me pretty early in my lifetime. And I never wrote you deviated from that.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
03:15
I had a lot of people push back on me, including my my own family thinking that I should become a teacher. Causes like teachers and secretaries like Liken teaches the nurse. I I'm going this direction. And so the first nurse person, like nurse in the family and stuff and I think, went on to be had My mom and others were extremely proud that I did kind of pay my home pathway there. But that's how I got started. And I can tell you they challenged me. And so I started as a candy striper. I took a nursing assistant course in high school and first accomplice at home. And the more I did that, the more I knew I was doing the right thing. I've never worked outside of healthcare, and him often said I should really try to do that sometime. And I thought, Now I would get so frustrated because people just don't understand efficiencies and what it means to, like, really have toe move quickly and problems up in the moment. And, you know, I would probably get really frustrated, try to redefine their whole place.
Alli:
04:09
So, yeah, you're actually doing I mean, you're actually kind of doing what your mom and Grandma were saying, right? You're still graduate here within the nursing field. That's amazing.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
04:20
I went to a three year nursing program, and I love my diploma program was great. Great experiences. I went into your force when I got out of nursing school. Um, and then, after being here for some, we had a two year commitment, which was long enough for me to spend infind it to be what I really thought it was gonna be. I went back then to get my bachelors my masters, and now I have my doctoral degree. And I was the chief nursing officer for the scene system for, like, 19 and 1/2 years and went from two hospitals to 11 plus a lot of other stuff, and it was great experience. But I've been gone from that. I tell people I'm not retired. I'm Justine, prefer men, and we do things that prefer to do.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
05:07
I'm teaching in the DNP permit. Texas Tech. I was in their first inaugural class and I had created a chief nursing officer. Tell me which was actually my doctor. Focus was on board infiltration of new CEO knows and so uh, created in tow actual 32 and 1/2 day leadership immersion experience and have both won now for noon, Aspiring to be and then this, you know, to is actually afford the more a tenured nurse executives I have over 140 people have come through since I started and and many of whom have not moved in to see, you know, the first time and or other really great exciting things. I get a lot of joy from watching people really get their talents on least and be able to go in, like, really to make a change on dumb. And then I just have done magnetism thing and do executive coach development and work. I teach Khalid. A manager works up, so I'm having fun. I'm in charge of unearned international nursing conference. You know, I'm involved in German activities at the national and state level, so it's some kind of fun to be in a place where you can kind of go. Well, now I don't really want to do that kind of job again. I never wanted back to the working for a big corporation. I've been there, done that.
Alli:
06:28
It sounds like you have a lot of preferred activities thing. That's a long list of things that you've got going on. That's fantastic. So you're and take all of your experience and pouring into others who are fallen after you. And I love that. And I do have a question about your, um so you got your are in your B s and your masters, your doctorates. So what in practice have you learned since completing the on boarding and in culture eating of the new chief nursing officer's? What have you learned since the education part of it in practice,I think that the need for us to develop the leadership skills of all of our nurses is really, uh ah, priority. Nurses need leadership skills at all levels, even when you first start off. I mean, I think that's why the profession can be challenging. Is not only do I need to know this stuff to be a nurse, but I have to know how to delegate, manage my time, deal with conflict, you know, have a crucial conversation when someone's overstepping their boundaries or not doing what they're supposed to be doing. You know how I manage this kind of conflict and, you know, I don't think that we talking up about all of that And then you know, the fact that learning is life long and and I think that one of the key things and especially it's played out with a lot of the interviews I've done on the radio show is you got to be involved in your professional organizations. You've got to develop a network of colleagues. Don't be afraid to ask for new opportunities or, you know, see if there's a way Thio, go talk to somebody. If you think they're doing something kind of fun and sound exciting and fix the phone call, most people won't say no. And I think that you know what? When you get engaged in all those used to really understanding bigger picture and then the impact that you can have become that much greater And so you know, for me, you know I have high achievement needs. And so when I went into this system, you know, roll, it takes a lot longer, you know, to do something. And I thought this is probably the worst job somebody could give meSo, you know what I did? I would go home. And if I was really frustrated like nothing was moving then like a vacuum and I could take out the trash and results and be happy for the day. So,you knowsatisfied my team that ease and then keep going.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
08:49
Yeah, but, you know, once things started for people and they could see the benefit of coming together as a a system, I really was pushing horizontal integration and did realize love to dumb back then to know that it's hard to do. And so he did it, and my boss would stand up and say The level of care is the same. It any seat facility. And I said, Don't go. No, it's not and are not yet. And so that was his vision and how well, we better get moving. And and, uh, we did a lot of that, but it was, you know, challenging, as you might imagine initially. But I'll tell you, the staff got it. They could see the benefits of coming together and really standardizing things and starting to look at things in the bigger picture because you get a lot more ability to influence in the organization. When you start having successes like that cousin, you go ask for things. You've got success people more likely to believe that this is a good investment. And so how do you keep moving things board and then starting to showcase what they were doing? My job was to figure out what I needed to do that help them get the Berries out of the way so they could do the best care that they were trained to do and have joy in terms of when they came to work and they were in a healthy work environment. So my highest, always was that the staff nurses are happy the rest of the outcome will fall into the right places.
Alli:
10:15
Definitely, yeah, You know, I do work in a big for the big corporation, and there's a lot of opportunity within that. I mean, I've started on my team. I started a professional development and group, so we're able to kind of help each other, you know, with books suggestions and podcast suggestions and all of that fun stuff. But in an institution where it's not necessarily so forward thinking. What advice would you give to those? Maybe those new nurses who were still just trying to figure out what their job is? Um, but maybe they wanted more. And they want to continue to learn every day and grow. And where would you tell them to start?
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
10:52
I think that they start with their managers and directors. I think they see work that their leader is trying to accomplish and say, Hey, I can do that for you. I've got some ideas or if they've got ideas on how to improve something, you go to their leader and say, Hey, did you know that we're having issues with such and such? And I've got a few things that I'd like to try. You know, can I get your support and cannot be afraid? Toe sort of push the status quo. And, you know, I think that a lot of the nurses that are coming out of school there are up to date on the latest seventh practice and and they've got good technology skills, especially the younger nurse. And so how do you take that enthusiasm and figure out how to help create the kinds of changes that are needed to improve patient outcomes, because that's what it's all about, what is having the best outcomes you can for the people we take care of, and that includes their family and loved ones. And so you know, not being hesitant. Oh, have a voice and being ableto show that not only do I have a problem, I'm gonna come to you and talk to you about that I think needs to be worked on. But I have some idea that I'm willing to take that one, and and if you'll help me and support my ideas that I'll lead it because one of things that I coach managers on particularly you don't do this work myself. Look, nobody does. You could have done through others. So your role is hot to you, helped create the environment where people are gonna feel like they can put their hands up and say, I've got an innovative idea I want to share. I'd love to have your support to test the following or I just been is coming back from the national Conference. I gotta tell you, we've got an issue here and what I was learning is we should be changing A, B and C and D, and I'm willing to take it. So it's not just dumping on the leaders within. You find problems but engaging with them for being able to then taken lead something. And, you know, I think that's the kind of stuff. And then not to be afraid, I gotta get involved in a professional organization, whether it's their specialty, the American Mersin Association. It's a great opportunity to really get voices heard and and, uh, our leader with the Americanization, there's leaders, so there's lots of ways really find other light. Colleagues that are tryingto do the same sorts of things. And you know, these meetings get engaged. You'll find mentors both outside the hospitals that might wherever they work, as well as maybe inside and and more than one or two mentors. Several people that have mentored means depending on what kinds of things I was engaged in. And you know, there's people always want me to help you grow, and so if you don't like what mentor to go fight another what happened. But you can't be hesitant to get engaged and and I would be the thing that has been amazing about nursing for me, is it? I took time out when I Aah! Had my daughter. I had been trying to get pregnant for 10 years and I had no, I didn't think I'd ever have Children. So I got engaged in all kinds of stuff. I was probably the only person that Critical Care Nursing Association, American Associates Group was probably thinking. I was strange when they called to tell me I had not gotten elected gay. One of the directors,
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
14:13
I couldn't do it was practice. I want to take time off and I did it. I took off three months and I worked part time for six months. And, you know, I actually got a promotion during that. Time comes. My boss is Boston. You know, I'll let you do this on one condition, you come back and then you come back into operations. And they did. And
Alli:
14:33
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
14:33
so I ended up being in charge of critical care. But she saw value in investing in May, and and so, you know, if you don't ask, you don't know. Because I resigned my position. That's what he could do. I don't know what's up. Hey,
Alli:
14:45
what you got for me? Yeah. I think that's such a think. That's such an important distinction between raising your hand to address a problem and then raising your hand to address the problem and provide some possible solutions. Or at least you know, say I'll help to figure something out. And I think that's something that gets missed a lot. It just becomes a lot of, you know, maybe just that whiny nous and complaining, but not any progress being made. And so I like that you like that you made that made that distinction. I'm so I'm sorry. Go ahead.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
15:22
No, I had to kind of things that I always think to myself. If I'm thinking, Who are these people that created this? Whatever this is, I either need toe accept what the nationalization of other people are coming out with, or I need to find out who they are engaged in time. What? I think so. You can't just sit on the sideline and be critical. It's okay. That means good to get engaged. And sometimes when you get engaged, you go. Oh, I hadn't thought about cats over that or that, and so you begin to think differently. And then
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
15:52
and then the other thing that I always used to think is that when people go, I don't see what you're like. Like I can't understand what you're saying. I don't see that. I learned a lot of people are not visionary and they can't see things. So you paint pictures for because it's important to make sure that they understand where you're trying to go while you're trying to accomplish, and that, you know, they've got the answers. I have always believed step, have the answers. They work every single day and the leaders world to figure out what's working, what's not. How do we help you fix it, so that when you come to work, you feel like you've been in the best place and you've done the best care for your patients? You go home being proud. The cure you deliver, it doesn't sound hard, I mean, but it is. But you know, that's the goal is to
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
16:40
be really proud of the kind of care you gave today and and, um, not beat yourself up that you didn't get things done, which is what we tend to do
Alli:
16:49
right, Totally. And then if you are that person that's noticing those problems, you probably care a little bit more than the average bear, right? And so if you're coming home feeling that that way, it's always good to know that there's leaders like you that are waiting for those waiting to hear that waiting to be able to, you know, put the right process in place to make sure that it's like you said, better outcomes. Come on. I believe you're listening to this podcast because you are interested in learning what opportunities are available to you or you're curious about what your future could hold. One thing I've learned over the past few years of my own professional development is time management that is reflective of my priorities and values. And let me tell you something. Grocery shopping for my family of five used to be a huge waste of time and energy For me. Maybe grocery shopping is therapeutic for you and brings you joy. But if it doesn't, then let me help you optimize your calendar. Right now, I have been using insta cart for years and maybe their biggest fan. I can order groceries from all of my favorite stores and have them delivered to my doorstep within just a couple of hours. The best part is that each store will save my lists and then ordering becomes even easier. I can shop all the sales and see my total before a check out. Time management and budgeting has really never been easier for our in professions listeners. Insta Card is offering free delivery on your first order over $35. Just Goto are in professions dot com. Forward slash insta cart, which leads insta cart. Know that I sent you and help support this show. There are multiple stores available, and you can shop all of your favorite stores in one single order. You can chat with your shopper to add things you forgot or make substitution is that any of your items are sold out. Insta cart highlight steals to help you save money. And believe me, shoppers do pick the freshest produce and keep your eggs safe, too, and you can tip your shoppers accordingly. So Goethe or in professions dot com forward slash insta cart to get free delivery on your first order over $35. That's our in professions dot com forward slash insta cart Could you Could you give us my goal? The podcast is to make nursing jobs accessible and understandable. And I feel like there's so many nurses that our school and they're thinking like, Oh, I got to go to hospital. Right? But there's so much beyond that. So could you tell me, like, What do you do? What? What is the CNO do day to day? What is that? Actually, what is that role? Actually
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
19:21
the TV nursing on a roll. Yeah, well, you know, it depends if you're a sight if your regional funeral of your systems, you know, but basically your return it. If you're the architect of patient, they're really looking at. So how do you make sure you have the right number of nurses? What? The right kinds of competencies and talents doing the right kinds of things and achieving the right kinds of outcomes. And so you're looking at work force management, your recruitment, retention, you know what kind of pipeline do you have? What? See on boarding process for new nurses? You know what your are Your leaders are being formed. How your leaders are performing what are the metrics, your accountable for US financial, its quality. It's safety, you know, That's both employees safety as well as patient safety. Could we have people getting hurt on the job with back injuries? Natal six. And we're from violent patients and families that Mom sometime act out. And so I'm looking at you know, how do you also be sure that you're upholding like the accreditation and regulatory standards, which are many in number? And then, really, you know, for me, it's always been about the work environment. For that, people come to work in it that the place that they're coming has. It's a good place to work, and it's cut the right equipment and the right kind of support for them. And it was really all of what's needed underneath toe, Really be sure that the nurses are able to do the comic you're they need to be doing. And that includes building relationships with pharmacy and respiratory and positions on the whole nine yards. When the team works well together, the patient winds when the team doesn't work so well together, patients don't win, and I'm all about the patient's winning, So how do you really get people working well together, being really clear about put in for the day and plants the state when it comes to patient care into your point. You know, I I would tell you that a lot of discussion going on nationally on How do we also change potentially students experiences that they get the full continuum of care. They have opportunities and outpatient settings the ambulatory etcetera in. And I know that, you know, we actually had worked with my former role on You know, if you've got a nurse that really wants to go to an ambulatory site, can we come up with a way to help them do that? And and I think some of that is you gotta make sure they've got the fundamental skills down when they are out in some of those sites, they're more likely to be by themselves less Reese. There's less. People go. Hey, here's what I'm thinking. Check it for me, my on base with this Or am I not seen this correctly? And so I do think that you're absolutely correct that in nursing school they need to be able to have a session with a company like that would come in.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
22:20
doing the radio shows have been fascinated with some of the stories of my peers. Like, How did you decide that? Someday you might want to grow up to be the president of the American Nursing Association? Well, nobody really knows that. But it comes to us yesterday in your career. Or how did you end up becoming the person that's in charge of No N I H or you know you're working. As you know, a person is now in charge of Microsoft, which, you know, I never knew they had a CNN. So what they do,
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
22:53
it's Yeah, it's been fascinating for me, and I'm pretty connected toe figure out Like what Some other people's roles are in question. Were working for different drug companies and equipment companies, and, uh, but insurance companies nurses are doing amazing case management to try to keep people out of the hospital. But rolls today that never existed when I first came out of school. And so the the rules going forward, we're gonna offer change. E, I think is you see CBS and Walgreens and others entering this market, you know there's gonna be new jobs that don't exist today, and different demands are going. Just allow different pathways for people, which is exciting. It's one of these that we say that nursing is awful because there are so many things you can do in your career when you're a leader and you're trying to get that. No, you don't really think nursing so often when people have too many choices because they leave you trying tokeep him. But
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
23:54
But nevertheless, I think, you know that's the beauty is that there are so many different things that, um versus kin. To me, it's just amazing profession. You can't get bored.
Alli:
24:06
Honestly, that's so true. And I and I think that's what I want to stress the most is that, you know, as nurses there are so many jobs that we do that I just feel like Why why did I do this again? What what was the what was my reasoning for wanting this job and it's just okay, Well, maybe that's not the perfect fit. Let's try something else, and with the same degree, you can have literally any job, so it's just it's so encouraging to hear you know what? What you've seen in the, you know, as you've been a nurse leader on and I I would love to know what your opinion is for moving into 2020 the year of the nurse. What do you think a successful year of the nurse would be?
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
24:47
Well, that's a big question. And I would tell you that there's a lot going on nationally that I keep stressing that people have got to get engaged and then be, ah, part of in, um, I don't know if you know that there's a Nightingale challenge and there's nothing now it's we've been. It's been declared by the World Health Organization that this is the year of the nurse Florence has now turned. I think she's like 200 years old and she still looks the same. So But I think that the 2020 2030 future nursing Ah group that's been meeting that from the National Academy Medicine there could be coming out with their recommendations on what needed going forward. I think there's gonna be continued push on advanced degrees and education and training. I think people are gonna be looking at more PhDs. There's a lot of nurses that have gotten their damn peas, and we don't want to lose that scientific track as well. I think that they've been looking at How do you have nurses in every part of the continuing to really change and create more of a culture of health? You know, how do we prevent somebody's costs that we've got incurred? You know, um, maybe we can help change the legislation around, you know, incentivizing and paying for things that prevent people from getting sick instead of what we do today is pay for care rather than give you incentives when you say healthy. And I think that trend
Alli:
26:16
has
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
26:16
started already by big employers. You were saying? You know, if you have a normal weight and you exercise, you don't smoke and you don't do this, you don't do that, Then we're gonna give you a repaid. We're going to give you cheaper health insurance. So, you know, I think that nurses can make a difference in their local communities getting them on board, like really influence. What kind of food and drinks Kids have it school or what kind of exercise they do or do not get. So how are they teaching them to manage their stress? You know, the millennials is most stressed out group we have and you know, the social impact with the social media. You know, how do we start really? Looking at what is the impact of all of that for nurses right now coming out of school here, from faculty and up. This is the concern that you know, the nurses and not just nurses. It's just about every all the youngsters that they'd rather text you a problem about what? What's going on with their patient and call you. And so you know,
Alli:
27:16
how do we
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
27:17
make sure people are not losing those skills? Because, look, I mean, look how much conversation goes on that's online. And, um and people are bolder as you know, when you can e mail somebody you don't have to look atyou is I'm telling you the message
Alli:
27:33
is a bit
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
27:33
more instability or all you see on Facebook is how awesome my my life is. It's just perfect. And if you're not feeling like your life perfect to get depressed, I mean, there's just so many opportunities for nurses to get engaged in helping to change the way we provide care going forward because we've got a switch. The model, you know, this is the most unhealthy population of kids we've ever had, and I think the focus on obesity has been really good, and we're starting to see some improvements. But if we don't make changes, I mean these, you know more. Ah, young kids with type one diabetes. You just know the complications are expensive when they go on to need dialysis for having amputation or whatever it is. And so because I started to, you know, howto really change some of them. I'm sure you've heard the social determinants of health things that we know greatly impact, how healthy you'll be or not be.
Alli:
28:28
When there's
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
28:29
a report called the ZIP Code report, it's on the art of you J Foundation's website, and you can see how healthy you and what your life expectancy is more like most likely to be. The pound this code you live in. So we know if you live in an area that there isn't any store that sells apples and fresh fruits. It's just, you know, candy and chips, and he can't play outside because there's too much going on gun violence or drug deals going on. I mean, we know we've got a certain changing some of those kinds of factors or it's gonna become even bigger is a problem for us. Look at the opioid problem that we're having and and now these kids a taping. I mean, it's good.
Alli:
29:14
It's that's so true. And I think I think it's an interesting time because, like you said, with all the social media, I mean, I don't even understand what the world was going to be like, you know, for my kids and having to navigate that I'm dreading that conversation. But at the same time, you know, with LinkedIn and I was just talking with Kara from Holly Blue and just the things that are becoming available. As you know, the technology is getting smaller and faster, and everybody is able to connect it. And I mean, I get to sit here and I'm talking with you right now. This feels like such an honor toe learn from you, and it's just a simple, you know, simple chat. So I just think it's you're totally right. There's so many things that need to happen. And I'm so glad that we now have the ability for great minds to collaborate so much easier. And I think, you know, things are gonna can get better. And I think it it could happen at an exponentially faster rate. So I'm so excited for that. I just had
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
30:10
just gonna say, you know, there's four million nurses in this country. Can you imagine if we all united something
Alli:
30:15
that would be pretty fun. When I worked,
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
30:18
I worked my you know, And we will be working on something that we want to take forward to. The other senior executive cetera You start, we say to them united, we stand divided, we fall. Are we really, truly all in agreement on this or not? And go around the room yet say it out loud.
Alli:
30:38
Are you
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
30:38
ready to say yes or no? And his? The irony is that we started getting things through so well, and I never I didn't present it all. I used to have them presenting and I sometimes spray and then sit down. And, um, the feedback I got was nothing is too influential is too much power around here, and I just laughed. I was like, Well, good for you to notice it.
Alli:
31:05
And why is
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
31:06
that a problem for you?
Alli:
31:08
But
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
31:08
some people don't like that.
Alli:
31:10
Oh, my goodness.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
31:11
So we have a lot of work to still do in making sure that our leaders are well prepared and can impact the rest of the C suite so that we can change that girl boy steps. It's out there
Alli:
31:25
because it's still
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
31:25
very real.
Alli:
31:26
Yeah, definitely. And I think that I think this is the year of change. I really do feel just in talking with, you know, people like you and other people I've been interviewing on the podcast and everything that they're gearing up. Florida Thio celebrate nursing and bring awareness to the profession and equip students, you know, for for the professional. I think it's exciting. Um, Joyce, what would you say if you could go back in time and tell yourself you're nursing student version of yourself? One piece of advice. What? What would you tell her?
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
31:58
Become involved in New York and professional organizations. And if you've got an opinion, don't be hesitant. Bring it, boy. And and, uh, you know, and be okay with getting pushed back because you will be okay with making a decision that wasn't so great. She will. You know, when I do the scene academy, one of the things that we talked about, I think the first time I did this was kind of funny. They were silent, you know? And I thought, Oh, my God, that would they? I did. I bomb or what? They were shocked that I shared examples of things that I had made. That dummy was, like, really bad, and they were amazed that I was willing to share. Then I
Alli:
32:39
hope
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
32:39
you don't share that. I said, how do you learn? I said so. You also have to be ready. For How do you recover from doing something that you wish you'd been writing an e mail cause you would have revised which right
Alli:
32:53
in your mouth, right to live
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
32:54
up in there with all done now. So you know, what do you do?
Alli:
32:58
You know,
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
32:59
because that's part of what you need to be coached on. What was howdy Regain relationships when you did something. And people are mad at you
Alli:
33:10
nursing too, because so many times I mean mistakes made in the nursing field can have very dramatic effects. So to be able to step up and stand up and say, Hey, something may not be right here. I'm not sure. Um, I think that's such a good a good example toe to set,
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
33:28
you know. But, you know, I think that being open for where your path may take you because I came out a different path that I had ever dreamed up. I never dreamed of becoming a chief nurse. I wanted to be in charge of a cardiovascular critical care unit and I never got to do that. But I got to be in charge of critical care in general. And I loved it when I came to Austin. Initially, I had I was the vice president for Critical care, cardiac, all kinds of stuff. I was loved what I was doing, and my boss made me the chief nurse and then gave me a joint commission responsibilities. And then that was OK until we became four hospitals, five hospital, six hospitals. But I had a give up. My direct operational experience is that was very hard, very hard news, like, you're making me give up my C scar and my cardiac. That's been my focus, my life. And he's like But you'll be This will be good for you. It's like God,
Alli:
34:26
no, But you you had someone that was really seeing those strengths within you and kind of pushing you into that direction a little bit, Um, and you're able to feed on that. That's it's good to have leadership that that can see those talents and traits and pick him out and, uh, support the nurses as they're coming up into the leadership. That's awesome.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
34:48
You've just been meetings and listen to somebody speaking like, Who said Staff nurse leaned over to one of my directors and they think okay, because I always felt like I was a talent scout.
Alli:
35:01
Oh, that's good. Joyce, thank you so much for coming on today. I'm I know that you were having some issues with your losing your voice, and I appreciate that you still took the time to come share your wisdom and your experience with us, and I will be go. I will share the on the show notes all share all about the all about nursing show And is there any other contact information you want me to put in there with your show nuts?
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
35:26
Um, if you want to give them, maybe we put the link to the all about nursing show. That would be fine.
Alli:
35:32
And then if they want
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
35:34
to contact me, you know, then I'm happy to have them do that as well. If there's questions or comments and stuff, that would be fine. To even get them my email address if you want.
Alli:
35:45
Okay, great joys. Thank you so much. I really appreciate it.
Dr. Joyce Batchellor:
35:48
You're too
Alli:
35:49
likes. Like what an amazing opportunity to hear from Dr Bachelor, who is such an invaluable leader in the nursing industry. Nurses, please take Joyce's advice and speak up, step out, ask questions. And in doing so, not only will you create a better working environment, but you will lead change that will greatly improve our patient outcomes. I hope this conversation was helpful for you, and if it was, please let me know. Feel free to take a screenshot and tag me in your instagram stories, and if you would like to support the show, just head over to patri on dot com. Slash are in professions there some fun incentives for patrons so please check it out if you haven't yet, please subscribe to the RN professions podcast. Follow me at our end Professions on instagram and please join in on the conversation. We've got a lot to talk about. And if you would like to be on the podcast to share your specialty and nursing journey, we love to hear it. Please connect with me at alley at our in professions dot com. That's a l l I at r and B r o f e s s i o n s dot com Thanks for tuning in.
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