RN Professions

Ep. 11: Holistic Career Coach

February 10, 2020 Season 1 Episode 11
RN Professions
Ep. 11: Holistic Career Coach
Chapters
RN Professions
Ep. 11: Holistic Career Coach
Feb 10, 2020 Season 1 Episode 11
Alli Merrell, Keith Carlson

Nurse Keith has been a nurse since 1996, and has worked in a variety of clinical settings, including home health, community health, case management, public health, hospice, and nursing education. He also held management and executive positions, including Chief Nursing Officer and Director of Nursing.

Keith is a Board-Certified Nurse Coach (NC-BC) under the auspices of the American Holistic Nurses Credentialing Corporation. He also holds previous certifications in Swedish Massage, Kripalu Yoga, and Laughter Yoga. Previously, Keith studied the visual arts, dropping out of two Philadelphia art schools in the early 1980s. With equal passion for nursing and coaching, Keith translates that dual passion into a desire to help nurses experience the most satisfying careers possible.

Writing is one of Keith's other passions in life, and he is a popular freelance nurse writer and blogger for a number of nursing websites and one print magazine. He has maintained his award-winning blog, Digital Doorway, since 2005, and has also been published in several non-fiction nursing books.

Keith's podcast, The Nurse Keith Show, was launched in January of 2015, and offers weekly nursing career advice, information, and inspiration for nurses and healthcare professionals who want to take their careers to the next level.

Please visit Keith's career coaching website, NurseKeith.com. Also, consider visiting his blog, Digital Doorway and tuning into The Nurse Keith Show, a nursing career podcast. Connect with him on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, too! 

Show Notes Transcript

Nurse Keith has been a nurse since 1996, and has worked in a variety of clinical settings, including home health, community health, case management, public health, hospice, and nursing education. He also held management and executive positions, including Chief Nursing Officer and Director of Nursing.

Keith is a Board-Certified Nurse Coach (NC-BC) under the auspices of the American Holistic Nurses Credentialing Corporation. He also holds previous certifications in Swedish Massage, Kripalu Yoga, and Laughter Yoga. Previously, Keith studied the visual arts, dropping out of two Philadelphia art schools in the early 1980s. With equal passion for nursing and coaching, Keith translates that dual passion into a desire to help nurses experience the most satisfying careers possible.

Writing is one of Keith's other passions in life, and he is a popular freelance nurse writer and blogger for a number of nursing websites and one print magazine. He has maintained his award-winning blog, Digital Doorway, since 2005, and has also been published in several non-fiction nursing books.

Keith's podcast, The Nurse Keith Show, was launched in January of 2015, and offers weekly nursing career advice, information, and inspiration for nurses and healthcare professionals who want to take their careers to the next level.

Please visit Keith's career coaching website, NurseKeith.com. Also, consider visiting his blog, Digital Doorway and tuning into The Nurse Keith Show, a nursing career podcast. Connect with him on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, too! 



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Alli:
00:00
Hi Keith. How are you?  
Nurse Keith:
00:56
I'm fine. How are you?  
Alli:
00:58
I'm good. I'm glad to finally be talking to you. I've been listening to your podcast. It's really been enjoying it. So thank you for coming on to mine. So I just kind of want to roll right into it. If you don't mind. I think there's we've got so much to talk about. I was actually looking over your credentials. And I think nurse Key is is great, because I think, I mean, it's this umbrella that houses so many credentials and experiences. And I think the world's most interesting man would have suited you. Justus. Well, is Nurse Keith. Of course you're welcome. So, I mean, I would love if you would just come and go over your, um, all of your experience is far as nursing goes kind of where you started and then the steps that you've taken on the different rules that you've had that have fled you up to the nurse Keith with your coaching and everything that you're doing now.
Nurse Keith:
01:52
Oh, my gosh. Okay, Yeah, Let me see. So I became a nurse in 1996 20 some odd years ago. Um, I only had a high school diploma. Up until that time, I was 32 years old and I had been a massage therapist, a yoga teacher. I'd worked with people in various, um, realms as a caregiver, personal care attendant, that sort of thing. And nursing just kind of came along because I had nurses. In my family, there are a lot of different things that kind of pushed me into nursing, which was a very good choice. And I made a very specific choices. Well, when I finished with my a d n to not get a job in acute care, which I was told was absolute career suicide, if you will. And I said, Youknow what? That's okay. I'll do it anyway.Thats sort of the way I am in my life. So that's what I did. And I've never been unemployed except when I wanted to be unemployed since 1996. So it worked, even though people told me it was professional suicide, and I went on to get my B s and fairly quickly within a few years. And I really focused on home health, hospice and intensive outpatient case management with a little public health here and there. And I also taught in some some community colleges in LPN program, so I've done a whole bunch of things. But in 2005 I was sitting in front of the fire with my brother and Massachusetts Rose living at the time, and he said, You know, there are these things called blog's. You're a good writer. Why don't you tryone. And I was like, uh okay, so I launched a plug that night or the next morning.
Alli:
03:43
Challenge accepted.  
Nurse Keith:
03:45
Yet challenge accepted from my big brother. And I ended up, you know, creating a blogger. I had no idea what I was doing. And actually, no one at the time knew what they were doing wa  2005. Nobody knew it. Blogs really were all about yet. It was all pretty much this grand experiment. And lo and behold, when I eventually started writing about my work as a nurse, that sort of caught hold like I've noticed. Oh, my gosh. Like people are actually responding to this. So that led to me really focusing the Blogging on nursing within a year or so. And then I was really doing it for fun. I saw it as a service, and I saw it is fun. And then I started getting contacted to write for different nursing and medical websites. So I did that for free for a while till I realized Oh, my gosh, I could actually get paid for this. So it turned into ah, freelance writing Career is well, so it's just been this progression from nursing to blogging to freelance writing. And then coaching came along. Then speaking on stage came along and podcasting. So it's been this kind of inexorable, slow and steady progression from one thing to the next. I just kind of have been rolling with it ever since.
Alli:
05:03
It's awesome. I mean, looking at just where you can't come from with your massage and yoga and then going into home health and hospice and that that sort of thing. It kind of seems like you you kind of knew how to focus your strengths in on that one toe one. Um, because I think nursing can be so crazy and depending on which industry, not industry did. The department you're working in that really predicts how you're interacting with your patient. So it seems like you picked those those more personal departments where you can really affect how their how your patient's care is going. And so that actually just makes this coaching so obvious. I mean, that you've had this history with one on one, um, you know, went toe one care. So how long have you been coaching and can you tell me a little bit about about how you coach nurses?
Nurse Keith:
05:55
Sure, I've been coaching for about 10 years since about 2010 2011 and it started out as sort of avocation. I was checking it out. I did some very basic training's just to get my feet wet and eventually became a board certified nurse coach, which is really the only designation given to nurse coaches by the A and A and the agent A. So board certified nurse coaches a thing now. So it before really wasn't recognized within the nursing profession, which is it's very nice for coaches to now be recognized as viable as nurse coaches. So that's a whole movement that's been happening. And I focus my particular brand of coaching. I call it holistic career coaching because, yes, I helped with resumes. Yes, I hope, with linked in and getting ready for interviews and that sort of thing. But I also like to do a little bit of what one might call life coaching along the way because yes, I can help someone do their resume and get ready for an interview. But if they're absolutely miserable and their life is falling apart, we do need to look at that to a certain extent, and I know where to draw the line between psycho therapy or counseling and coaching. So I do recommend to a lot of clients that they get into therapy or counseling if I see that there's issues standing in their way. So I delve into those realms a little bit until I see that, Yeah, this is really the place for a licensed mental health professional, right? And then I'll say, you know, we can keep coaching, but I actually really think you should be in therapy because we can't go any further with this particular line of questioning right, because we're getting into trauma or something like that that I'm obviously not license to actually to treat. So I draw the line there. But holistic career coaching means that we take your entire life into into account. So, yes, I can help someone find a job. But I also need to know, you know, how many kids do they have? What kind of life do they want to lead? Because a certain type of job doesn't lend itself to every type of life writer lifestyle, So I really want to know what what my clients love like, what do they look to do what they do with their kids? What I do with their spouse? Where did they go on vacation? Because that informs me the kind of life that they live or the kind of life they wish to live. And then my job is to help them narrow their focus and their their networking and their outreach so that they can work towards the life that they really want. Does that makes sense?
Alli:
08:41
that totally makes sense. So and then I love how you touched on the the counseling versus coaching part of aspect of it. You know that I can see that that could be very validating for someone who's coming to see career advice. Yet they may not know that they've got deeper issues and then tow. Have someone as professional as you say, Let's work on this together. Here's another resource for you to help you in this area. I can see that that would be really successful coming from you. So that's really great to point that out. Oh, yeah? And then excuse me. So could you tell me, like, for someone who's listening? That's thinking, man. You know I really would like to talk with you I want to know more about, Like, what are my options? How could I maybe streamline my career? What would it look like if someone were to contact you? Kind of. What are the first steps that you need to keep in mind?
Nurse Keith:
09:29
Oh, good   question. So the first thing is, people write to me and say, Hey, I'd like to chat with you. You know, maybe we could talk about coaching, So I send them a quick form to fill out something very simple just to kind of give me a sense of of who they are and where they're coming from so that when we get on the phone for that complimentary 30 minute call which I offer, everyone is a complimentary 30 minute call is they've told me a lot of the story already so that I have the back story that we can dig right into the more important stuff right away so they don't have to spend the whole call telling me their story because I already know it. So that helps a little bit, get, you know, kind of get things, get things where they need to be. So we're both on the same page and I understand where you're coming from. And then if someone decides to coach with me and they choose a package etcetera, then I give themlots of homework. This forms to fill out, and a fair amount of those forms is actually self, um, self reflection, because I really need to understand not just the life you want to lead, but where you're coming from in the wave, you yourself. So I need to know how. What do you think your strengths are? What do your quote unquote weaknesses? What are the opportunities that you see coming your way that you'd like to take advantage of? And that kind of self reflection lends itself to coaching because coaching isn't just about, you know. It doesn't have to be just about tasks like fill out this form, do the resume. It could be a lot more kind of open ended, because I my clients, range from pre nursing students. A few here and there, too, you know, masters level nurses who were looking for what the next great thing in their life is. So I coach people across the nursing lifespan if you will, and it can look very different for different people. But there's the same building blocks that I use for pretty much each client.
Alli:
11:34
I'm glad that you that you mentioned that because I know that sometimes people will ask for help, but they not make might not even know what they enjoy. Like, Would you like to do? I don't know. I like, yeah, So I think that's important. Is getting them thinking first So that that way you can really utilize your time together? Well, um, without without maybe getting into the specifics could you share maybe, like a success story of someone that you have coached recently and then maybe like what a win is? I just want to give nurses an example of, like, the types of things that you should be contacting a coach for sure.
Nurse Keith:
12:07
Well, I had one nurse come to me from Arizona who she was trying to work on her resume and her linked in to do some good networking because she was trying to decide what our next step was where she wanted to work. She was willing to go anywhere in the United States, and then she was looking at a nurse practitioner program, so we worked on all her stuff. We worked on her resume. We talked about what she really wanted out of life. She was in her twenties, so she was relatively young and still trying to figure it out. You know, she was single, and so we worked on her resume. We helped prep her for interviews. We did cover letters and I hope to around the whole application process and kind of vetting different employers. Like, what's the reputation of this one versus the other? So she ended up going toe to Nashville working for a hospital there, and then when she was ready, she started applying to nurse practitioner programs, and I helped her with the essay and some of the prep work for applying to N P School. And she got into the MP school, Columbia, which is the really high level nurse practitioner program. And she's happily going to school Columbia now. So she went from Arizona to Nashville to New York City, and so that's been very successful. She got that great job down in Nashville and then got into a great end P program. Another nurse, he came to me was from New York City. She had actually been a nurse for quite some time and then took get this. She took 18 years off to raise her Children. She had worked in 18 years. And when someone comes for career coaching, who has what one might see as a liability, like not having worked for 18 years there she's got a She had a tough road. I know, you know. So we had to really look it. Okay, How do you speak with the potential employer and explain what you've been doing the last 18 years? And I don't necessarily recommend anyone take 18 years off from their professional. You need to keep your foot in the door somehow, like maybe ju do. Ah, per diem shifts every month. You know, just do something. But I have helped quite a few people like this woman, and she actually found on awesome job. And she has now moved on to something else in nursing. But I did help her successfully land a really great job that she loved. And when you have that quote unquote liability, you you need to be able to tell your story in a compelling way. So I like to talk to nurses about how do you brand yourself? What's your personal brand and how do you communicate who you are? So that's a lot of what I do. And I really enjoy working with people like that because there were so driven. They really want what they want. And I like helping them get it.
Alli:
15:01
And that's so great. Because I think that I think there would be if more people knew that having a coach was an option. I think, you know, being able to like you said, get prepared for to make sure it's even the right employer. Like, you know, I think we're so one sided at times where I hope I get this job. I hope I get this job. But maybe you shouldn't. Maybe there's something better. Maybe you could prepare yourself and think, you know, in a different direction. Or maybe you could talk to Keith and see Oh, I didn't even know this job was a thing, and that's what I really want to do. So I think that's I'm glad you shared those two different stories because I think that's I think that's so wonderful that there's someone like you to reach out to who? Who can give them that type of answers. I think you're so right your personal brand. I mean, it sounds so you know, 2020 to say, Oh, my prime working on my personal brand But it's a real thing. I mean, we're living, you know, everything's online. Well, that's how we interface with each other's, you know, and that's how you stand out from the rest. So I think that's you.
Nurse Keith:
15:58
That's true, right. And I know personal brand can sound like a real catch word right now. Or what do they call it a catch phrase, or like one of those words that you know are overused and sure it can get overused. But if you're, ah, healthcare professional, a nurse out there in the job market and you're trying to distinguish yourself from other people like you're trying to show, what makes you stand out, that's your brand. It's like, What do you bring to the table? You know, what are the experiences and skills you have under your belt and who are you, you know? And what is it like to to work with you or have you on a team, and that's your brand. For lack of a better term, we could call it something else. But it's the same thing. And people think of brands as you know, like Nike has a logo and that's their brand. And that's not really what a brand is a brand. Is Theo experience? Someone has of interacting with you, so your brand as a nurse might be your compassionate. You're kind. You, um you really value, um, the individual you love working with families or family systems like That's part of who you are. And I like to try to help people. Nurses specifically find their voice like find How do I express who I really am? Because to be able to walk into an interview with your head held high and say, This is who I am? This is what I bring to the table. This is why I think I'm the best candidate for the job. Hire me, you know, to be able to say that is a very, very powerful thing. And I think nurses need to feel empowered to be able to speak up and say, Yeah, this is who I AM, and this is why I'm awesome and you need to be able to verbalize that it's very important skin.
Alli:
17:49
I think we miss that piece so much because I think oftentimes we feel like, Oh, we're you know, maybe I'm too my born to match er, you know, I don't want to brag, but it's like, No, you have to collect your strengths and your accomplishments and experiences. That's what makes you matter in any role that you're doing is what you're good at and what you enjoy and and how you interact with people and what's your personality type? And maybe what are some personal attacks that are get more difficult for you to work with? And how do you work through that? I think those air such important pieces that we just look at the job, you know, when you don't look it, if it's a right fit or in my the right fit, and is this gonna take me where I want to go? And I think you know it might have a a fresh term of personal grands, but absolutely I think that's I think that's so good to mention cause I think we're all kind of missing that piece a little bit,
Nurse Keith:
18:35
right? And can I just wanted to say one more thing to that. If I may, um, I feel like historically, nurses have always felt the need to diminish themselves. They'll say I'm not a doctor. Unjust, a nurse or I'm I'm not a I C.U nurse. I'm just a med surg nurse, and I once did a podcast on a block post about how just is a four letter word for nurses that whenever you say just in front of anything, it means you're saying it's not as good as something else. Like, I'm just a med surge nurse. And no, you're not just a med surge nurse. Your A med Surg nurse. You do important work in the world, and I feel like it's very important for nurses to learn to speak up and be proud of what they do. And this is the year of the Nurses 2020 rate. The World Health Organization declared it the year of the nurse, and it's the 200 birth anniversary of Florence. Nightingale are kind of our patron saint, right? So this is the year for nurses to kind of stand up and say, Hey, you know, this is who I am and this is what I do. And I'm proud of myself. And I think I do wonderful work in the world. So that's my main message to the nurses Listening out there is that you need to be proud and you need thio not be pride full, but you need to be able to embody who you are and stand up with your chin held high and see. Yup. This is who I am. This is what I do. And this is why I'm amazing. And that will take you a long way in your career.
Alli:
20:11
Totally. Yeah. Having pride and and where you're at now and doing that to the best of your ability will push. You ll even further until you know what That next step is for you. So that's so true. I heard a podcast episode that Christie right did on her business boutique on CASS and she talked all about that. We're just, you know, just removed. Just remove it from your from your vocabulary because it's always it comes out as a form of an excuse, right? We're kind of excusing something and so I think that's great. I'm glad you said that. I in fact, I find myself sending e mails and I'll see that word right there like, Oh, shoot. I've done it again. I gotta erase that one. Yep. Four letter word. I like that.
Nurse Keith:
20:51
Right, cause you could say I'm Just a nurse podcaster. I'm just a nurse entrepreneur. And, you know, does the doctor say I'm just a doctor? No. Doctor says I'm a physician. I'm a medical doctor, right? Or I'm a surgeon or whatever. And nurses, you know, for many gosh decades or longer, We were basically the maid. Servants toe doctors, right? It was Yes, Doctor. Yes, Doctor. Over And get your coffee, Doctor. And we have professionalized nursing from a vocation where we were what we used to be called, like pink collar or whatever. I mean, just ridiculous terms that have been slapped on nurses. Now, we are health care professionals in our own right, and we actually need to own that. And I think that is a very important message for nurses to own it and not make excuses anymore. There's no there's no room for excuses.
Alli:
21:45
Yeah, definitely. And I think I was I just was having a conversation about this as well. Nurses air coming out. We're so innovative, were so creative and nurses other ones that are selling a lot of problems because we're in it, right? We're seeing what the issues are. And, you know, if only we did it this way. And so nurses, I feel like this is a great year where we're going to really see an empowerment, Um, in a movement of nurse innovation and nurse leadership. And like you said, for the professionalization of the industry, I think is really exciting. So I'm looking forward to seeing, you know, all of that kind of building through the year. But I would like to talk Thio or with you about your writing. So you just started writing this blogger in 2005 for fun? And then then you said that you've got approached to write for different publications. So can you tell me, like like, how does all of that work
Nurse Keith:
22:35
So when you're writing for a publication, they do own the intellectual property because you're writing for them as not an employee, necessarily as a contractor. So when I do a contract with Let's say working Nurse magazine, who I write for or multi briefs news service, who I also write for. They own the cop the content because they're paying me for it and it becomes their intellectual property. When I write for myself on my blogger on my website or right podcasts, show notes, it's my intellectual property, and I can repurpose it and do anything I want with it. However, for someone else, yes, it's generally their property once you write it. And that's just sort of Ah, that's just the reality of the writing world. Now, if you can figure out a way to write for someone and actually retain the intellectual property rights on that awesome. But it's a very hard thing. Thio. Yeah, and and I think it's it's much more normal. Just just sign a non disclosure agreement or whatever you write. Whatever you sign a contract and due to writing for that particular venue. And that's that's really important to understand if you're going to get into the writing world and you could make a decent living as a writer, there's a lot of nurse writers out there. Many people do it as a side hustle is just like making a couple $100 extra here and there, which is also perfectly, perfectly good thing to do. Perfectly amenable thing to do if you just wanted to make a little bit of money on the side.
Alli:
24:16
So how would you go about? I'm very interested in this in writing, and I have noticed a lot of nursing writers out there. So I'm curious if what is the best way to approach writing for publications, is it? You write a full article and then you try to submit it, or you contact who's in charge of collecting the content and see what they're interested in. How does that go?
Nurse Keith:
24:37
Well, there's a lot of different ways So you could write a sample article on spec, Kind of like a contractor will build a house on spec and then try to sell it So you could do that. Um, I've never done that myself, though A lot of people do that. Um, what I recommend actually is building a body of work that you can then point to and say, Hey, here are examples of my work. So if you're a nurse out there, if you're listening right now and you don't have a website. You don't have a podcast. You don't have all this stuff. Here is what I recommend you do. Create a linked in profile, and if you need help, I can help you. I do linked in coaching. Or if you have a LinkedIn profile, make sure it's complete. And then most people don't realize that you can actually write articles on lengthen that are yours. They belong to you, and you can write those articles and then that becomes your little library of articles that you've published. And those can then get shared on other social media channels. And you can use those articles and send the girl, for instance, to a potential companies like to write for and say, Here are some writing samples. So having some published writing samples or great another way, you can kind of get started. His right guests posts for other people's blog's, especially nurses, nurse bloggers, right, guest post. Just to kind of get some stuff out there, because if someone's gonna want toe. If so, let me say this way. If you want someone to hire you to right, you need to show them you're a good writer, so you need to be able to demonstrate it. So that's those air some ways to demonstrate it. You can also launch a blogged. Just launch a simple block and start writing. Um, once you have a body of work that you can point to, you can look for organizations that hire nurses to write for them. They're pretty easy to find. Lots of health care organizations hire nurses, and then you can actually send out query DS and basically a simple email or query letter letting them know who you are. You're history what your areas of expertise is and some writing samples, and there's plenty of stuff on the Internet. You could find YouTube videos and articles and podcasts and blogged posts about how to market yourself as a freelance nurse writer. And there are also nurse writer groups on lengthen and Facebook thatyou conjoined, and you can talk to other nurses who write and get tips from them as well.
Alli:
27:06
Thank you. That's very useful information. So how long have you been a speaker?  
Nurse Keith:
28:59
I've been speaking for about 10 years. Yeah,
Alli:
29:03
so when you're asked to speak, what are some of the different topics? Different things that people are wanting to hear?
Nurse Keith:
29:10
Well, if someone comes to me for speaking, they've either come across my podcast or my blogger or articles or videos or something, and oftentimes it'll be something related to careers. So if I'm going to a conference and I'm speaking, I might be invited to speak on some aspects of nurse leadership. For instance, I might be invited to speak on some aspect of self care or nurse wellness. I've also been asked to speak on personal branding and things of that nature. Um, I've been invited. I've done workshops at different conferences. I did A I did a full day workshop on nurse leadership for an organization last year. That was really fun. So it all depends what they're looking for. I have a variety of spy talks that I have ready to go, and then I also get hired to to create talks that I don't quite have in my library yet, so to speak. So anything related to nurses, careers and also systems. I'd like to talk about systems like Why? Why does the system in your health care facility not work? You know what's going on there? What? How do you onboard your nurses? How do you care for your nurses? So I'm happy to speak to audiences of nurses but also leaders and CEOs and executives who need to hear these messages. So that's if I find speaking on stage really fun. And most people would probably say they'd rather die than speak on stage. But for some reason, I just I get up on stage and I feel really good. So I I enjoy it. So I do it because for me, it's super fun.
Alli:
31:00
That's cool. I know there's only a few of you out there, but we need to hear your voice. So work. I'm glad that it comes easy to you. So it sounds like a lot of your What you're speaking on is, you know that you've, um you've collected through experiences and just seeing, you know, through your many years of nursing. But then I'm also interested to know, Like, where are you doing your research and what are you staying? What types of things are you following so that you can stay relevant with your message. And, um, I guess you're your professional development. Like, how are you finding the tools Thio To continue doing what I do. Yeah, exactly, because I mean, you can look back for so long, but I know things change. So how are you? How are you doing that?
Nurse Keith:
31:47
Right. That's a good question. So one  thing as I'm very active on social media, So I monitor Facebook linked in Twitter instagram for what's happening out there in the nursing world, so that keeps me a kiss, my finger on the pulse of what's going on and there are particular people and organizations I very specifically follow. And then I also just follow different hashtags on social media to see what people are saying. So if I want to know what's up in nursing, I'll just goto linked and type in hashtag nursing and just see what pops up. I also used Google alerts through Google News to get news of health care. And then I also just, you know,go to the New York Times website. I go to different websites of news organizations, and I just check the feeds for new health care, nursing or medical or even technology innovations that are happening. So I keep pretty close tabs on what's happening out there in the world so that I can respond to it in real time. Like the new Gallup Poll came out recently. So I'd like to write about that. Um, I also reach out to my many, many, many members of my network who are nurses and health care professionals and just say, Hey, what's up? What are you thinking about these days? I have a lot of friends out there who I've I've nurtured over the years. So I planning a people to lean on if I'm looking for you know, what's the latest greatest thing you're thinking about these days? And that's very, very hopeful, too. So one of the things that I'm sorry, one of things I'd say is just having a great network of people to sue call on is just It's so valuable. I can't even put a price on it.
Alli:
33:35
I'm glad you said that because I was just looking up at the things they've written. So do you wanna mention your book on network? Yeah,
Nurse Keith:
33:43
So I have a book called Savvy Networking for nurses getting connected and staying connected in the 21st Century. And it's all about networking skills. So half the book is about face to face networking skills, like when you go to a conference. How do you work a room like, How do you actually like talk to people and then the other half is social media and covers Twitter, Facebook linked in an instagram for the most part, and obviously some of that will become obsolete as those platforms change. But for the moment, the later. The second edition is covers all the latest changes to linked in in 2019 and 2018. So that was one book. Another book is aspired to be inspired, creating a nursing career that matters. And that's basically 18 or 19 of my favorite and most popular blogger posts for My Bog, edited for the book and those of the two I have out there right now. And there's a few others that are rattling around in my brain right now,
Alli:
34:43
Don't you love that. It doesn't stop, right?
Nurse Keith:
34:45
Oh, never stops even. Even when I go to sleep
Alli:
34:49
That's so cool when I'm so glad that you have that book for networking because I think that's a piece that we often missus. Well, because typically we were just considering, you know, hospital jobs and be clock in clock out. And that's, you know, whoever we work with us, who we work with. But it's completely different world now where you know Justin's. I started this podcast. My social interactions with nurses, you know, throughout the entire country have just exploded because there's so many of these nurses that are utilizing social media like you're saying to connect with nurses doing cool things. So, you know, keeping in touch with nurses who are innovating and, you know, like like you said, you know what's new? What are you interested in these days? I think that's huge. Um, yeah. So can you tell us about your podcast?
Nurse Keith:
35:37
Sure. Yeah. Ah, the Nurse Keith Show I just recorded Episode 200 fifties, 266 today. That's been around a while. It's been quite a few years, and it was actually born from my first podcast, which was called RN FM radio, And we launched that back in 2012 January of 2012 7 years ago and no, eight years ago now. And that podcast lasted about 250 episodes went through several different iterations of guest host and co hosts, and I spun my show off of that one. It was mostly interviews, so I launched the Nurse Keith Show as just me. Just a monologue, me talking about nurses and careers. And I did that for who 190 episode and I Oh my gosh, I gotta give my audience a break from my voice and also give myself a little bit of a break So I started doing interviews and I do lots of them. And I interview people from doctors to nurses to even people who aren't in health care at. Although I've only done a couple of those, I've done a couple of lawyers who talked about health care. So I've really expanded the reach of this show by allowing of a more breadth and depth of guests. And I do also do monologue episodes. Every fourth or fifth show is just little old me. But in between, there's usually 3 to 4 interviews in a row. And today I just interviewed Donna Cardillo, who's one of the most famous nurses in the country, if not the world. And she was the advice nurse at nurse dot com for 15 years, and she's known as the inspiration nurse. And she's inspired me for years on end. I've interviewed all sorts of people. You'll be next, you'll be on that list, too, and it's really, really fun. And I love podcasting because it's my way of getting right between the ears of any nurse who wants. And it's great because, you know they're not videos, you know, people can listen to them while they do laundry while they walk the dog with a workout at the gym while they're shopping. So I love that intimate connection with my audience and the ability to reach them wherever they are. And I listened t what they want to know. Yeah, And you're a new podcaster, so Congratulations.
Alli:
38:08
Thank you. Yeah, I know I I'm an avid listener. I've been listening for years mostly to things that didn't matter that, you know, at that point in my life. But I was just curious about a It is such a very special platform because, I mean, with your what is 266 episodes on the latest podcast? That's amazing. That's so many conversations that you're learning from people who are doing amazing things and are sharing amazing ideas. And I think it's great. I really do. I I really, um That didn't have enjoyed your podcast so far. Have a listen. Old 266 yet, but oh, come on. What would you think? What do you think about this year? Is a nurse 2020. What would you like to see or what would you call a successful 2020?
Nurse Keith:
38:57
Okay. One thing I do not want to see. Let's start with that. I I wanna I want to not see that people are basically, you know, giving their organizations are basically giving their nurses, you know? Ah, tote bags and coffee mugs and flowers. I mean, that's nice. Who would they do that on Nurses Week? A lot, you know, And you get like, a tote bag with your hospital's logo on it or something, and some candy. And I mean, those kinds of things were fine, but you're the nurse is much bigger than that and what I want to see. I want to see organizations really step up and recognize nurses for their contributions and who they actually really are, and not just see them as so much cannon fodder to throw it, you know, patient care, and then let them, you know, burn out and then move on to working a Trader Joe's because they were tearing their hair out. I want to see these organizations take ownership of not of their nurses, but of the fact that they're in playing health care professionals who happen to be nurses. I want to see them really honor them more than just by, ah, luncheon or a tote bag or a coffee mug if you know what I mean. Um, I also want to see nurses embrace 2020 as an opportunity to say, You know, I can really be proud of what I do, and I can stay in my little niche and work in the med Surge unit, which is totally cool. You can also decide to, um, write an op ed for your local newspaper or write a letter to the editor about some health issue that's important to you or meet with your mayor because there's so many homeless people in your city, and you really want to do something about it and call attention to it, or you want to run for to be mayor or run for the school board or run for Congress for for for crying out loud. You know if there's do nurses who are members of Congress right now as we speak and we need more nurses to enter the realms of leadership, whether it's becoming, ah, a nurse manager or the CEO of AH or COO or CNO of a health care system or a home health agency and Also, I want to see Nurse is stepping out and talking to the media. You know, contact reporters at your local public radio station and say, Hey, I'm a nurse in the community. If you ever need a quote for some health, um, health care related issue Hit me up, Shoot me a text like you know what you're looking for. So I want to see nurse is kind of expand their view of who they are and what they're capable of and be able to communicate that to the world. And to me, that would be a successful 2020.
Alli:
41:47
And stop using the word just
Nurse Keith:
41:49
and stop using the word Just if we hear it. If we can just get rid of the word Just were and we're moving, we're moving in a good direction.
Alli:
41:56
So can I put you on the spot? Real quick? Go, friend. Okay. So for anyone that's in an institution that might be in charge of making these decisions, what would be some ideas for how to honor nurses aside from, you know, the flask or the, you know, bag of candy? Like, what would be a bigger idea that would really honor the nurses
Nurse Keith:
42:15
fill the flask with bourbon. Nam que um Now, um, I would say one is Do the nice things by them. Launch, Give them gift cards. Give him a tote bag in a flask filled with bourbon. That's fine. Or, you know, whatever. Um, no. Don't fill the flask with lack. Telos. That'll be really messy. So, uh, um, I also would say, Listen to them, have listening sessions with your nurses, find out what they're really thinking, understand their struggles and then actually invite them to the table because what they say, whoever they are, they say that if you don't have a seat at the table, you're gonna be on the menu. Stop having your nurse is on the menu where they get eaten alive at your organization. Invite them to the table, have them be part of the conversation. Don't just come up with ideas like, Oh, maybe we should do this. And this will fix the nursing problem. Invite the nurses to be part of that conversation. I think one way you can honor nurses is by recognizing that they actually have something to say. And if they actually have something to say, Listen, to what they have to say, and I think that goes a really, really long way to honoring them and actually bringing them in so that they feel that their value is recognized. And I think if your organization does not have a succession pipeline for leadership, create a succession pipeline, create opportunities for your nurses, the ones who are really keen on leadership to demonstrate their leadership skills and actually be groomed for leadership. Because granted, we have three generations working at any given time, right? Right now we have the baby boomers, the Gen Xers. I'm more or less a Gen Xer, and then we have the the Millennials who are becoming the largest portion of the work force in the entire world. And then we have GEN y coming up behind them. So if millennials are the new leaders, they're going to be in all the leadership positions within 10 years, maybe 15 tops. Right? So take those millennial nurses and groom them for leadership. Don't just treat them like they're older. Justin Nurse. We're gonna throw him out there to the lions, and then you know when when we're done with them will spit them out actually take them under your wing and and help them to become the leaders that they're capable of being because the millennial generation is the generation that's gonna change, what's going on in health care? I believe so. Give them the opportunity to do that. And I think that's really important.
Alli:
45:05
And that all goes back to the process is right the creating opportunities to groom them for leadership, like put your process in place. If it's not there and then and then you will have the steps and place to have not only good employees, but those who feel like they're working for an organization that's listening and supporting have been honoring them in their in their whatever path they're choosing to go. I think that's very well said, Thank you,
Nurse Keith:
45:32
Thanks. I think it's really important because, ah, lot of organizations, I think they really do treat their nurses like they're disposable and I'm sorry, but nurses were not disposable. Of course, there's always new students coming through schools, but you need to hold on to the people you have to and make sure they understand that you see them for who they are and you know that's my main message to those out there who really want to take 2020 and do something useful with it.
Alli:
46:02
Keith, if you could say one thing to yourself as a nursing student, what would you say
Nurse Keith:
46:08
if I was good to go back to that time?
Alli:
46:09
Yeah, looking back. With what you know. Now,
Nurse Keith:
46:12
I would say keep your mind open to what the possibilities are of what you can accomplish as a nurse, because it's a lot more than what they're telling you.
Alli:
46:23
Yes, seriously, I had no clue. You, you know, you graduate, and then you think, you know, like I just said, Do you think the hospitals where you're going? But there is so much out there. There are so many places for nurses.
Nurse Keith:
46:39
there are There are a lot of those air non clinical, and and the other message I would have is that you don't have to work clinically to be a real nurse, and a lot of nurses might argue with that statement, but I think nursing is a state of mind is not just something that you do
Alli:
46:56
Mmm. Yeah, I think that's great, Keith, Is there anything else you'd like to add or bring up for talk about.
Nurse Keith:
47:05
Well, I just like tosay that if anyone is in interested in coaching and this is shameless plug here, um, please go to nurse keith dot com and check out what I offer. There's a lot of resource is on my website and my block and podcaster free for the taking. So please make avail yourself of what's out there. And I'll also say that there are lots of other nurse bloggers and nurse writers and podcasters like Aly and me and many other people. And there's so many nurses doing really, really cool things. So expand your mind and allow yourself to think more broadly and more deeply about who you are and what you're doing as a nurse and what you want, because the world is your oyster and you just need to see what you want and go out and get it.  
Alli:
47:57
Absolutely. Thank you so much, and I will be sure to link to all of those resources that you shared and I know It's gonna be huge for all the listeners out there, so okay, thank you so much for taking your time to share with us today, I I'm so honored to have had a chance to talk with you and learn from me, so I really appreciate it.
Nurse Keith:
48:13
Thanks, Alli. And welcome to the world of nurse podcasters. You're more than welcome. There's so much space and I'm glad you're doing what you're doing.
Alli:
48:22
Doesn't he just have such a wonderful voice? Thanks again to nurse Keith for sharing your wisdom and expertise as a holistic career coach and listeners, please check out Keith's website at nurse keith dot com to find his articles, books, podcast episodes and coaching information. You can also head over to our end professions dot com and find all of these Resource is in the show notes. I hope this conversation was helpful for you, and if it was, please let me know. Feel free to take a screenshot and tag me in your instagram stories. And if you would like to support the show, just head over to patri on dot com slash R and professions. There some fun incentives for patrons, so please check it out if you haven't yet, please subscribe to the RN professions podcast. Follow me at our end professions on instagram and please join in on the conversation. We've got a lot to talk about. And if you would like to be on the podcast to share your specialty and nursing journey, we love to hear it. Please connect with me at Alley at our in professions dot com.
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